Evil is the Absence of God, and other BS

Since I can’t use plain logic to level with these people, I had to try and turn their own logic back on them. Tell me how you think it panned out…

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Comment by Joshua McGee on December 26, 2009 at 11:19pm
Thank you, Melissa, that was lovely.

This would be awesome longer-form, especially to consider the position of (some) Christians on Satan w.r.t. the "problem of evil", which, bewilderingly to me, suggests polytheism. If Satan weren't another deity, then (stealing an Eddie Izzard argument from another context), wouldn't God just flick Satan's head off?

LMK if you would like any assistance. I love working with super-cool atheists. :-)
Comment by Melissa on December 26, 2009 at 11:27pm
I won't turn down brainstorming help :)

In regard to the Satan argument, Christians would say God gives Satan free reign over the Earth in order to put followers through challenges, to make them better people and closer to "Him." Reference the book of Job.
Comment by Frink on December 27, 2009 at 6:29am
ahahaha, perfect background music. Good vid!
Comment by Joshua McGee on December 27, 2009 at 12:17pm
In regard to the Satan argument, Christians would say God gives Satan free reign over the Earth in order to put followers through challenges

Boy, is this ever a rich and dense topic. I spent a bunch of time studying Job, and there are about a half-dozen separable drafts in the text. It's cobbled together from lots of texts from lots of cultures over lots of time. And while ha-satan does show up in Job, the interpretation is different in Jewish and Christian tradition -- largely because the concept of Satan is largely extrabiblical.

But I like this one to argue against absence-of-God arguments:

Isaiah 45:7: "I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things."

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