Communication Via Text is Like Having A Conversation with God

Before I start, I want to let it be known that they are a lot of stimuli where I'm writing this.  It's easily distracting and my premises may not be as well-thought out as I would like.

Now, to give a back story on the actual topic... I'm a serial online dater.  The first step after talking via messages or e-mails is to get a phone number.  In this day and age, a phone number is for texting and you need extra permission before actually talking on the phone.  Well, you could wing it, but you would probably get ignored 9 times out of 10.  Anyhow, the last two or three girls that I had really started to like got mad over something that I said, again via text.  Seems like the hotter the girl, the more likely they are to be a factor in this type of thing, but that's neither here nor there.

You might be wondering to yourself, 'How does that tie back into having a conversation with God'?

Well, I will try to break this down as logically as possible, but as a warning, I haven't had to structure an argument in a long time, so it's not going to be entirely neat.

1.)  In text messages, you cannot read the emotional response or context of what is written.

2.) When reading the bible, you are reading the translation of a translation of copypasta... etc. etc.  That we can all agree is just as likely to be taken out of context even if it was the original copy since so much changes in 1900 years. (let's not kid ourselves.  even biblical scholars know that most NT books were written 50-150 AD or is it CE now?)

3.)  What the reader brings to the table, affects how they read the material.  No matter if it's Twilight, Astronomical Physics, or religious texts.

Conclusion Part A: Since it is thoroughly taught, "if you want a conversation with God, read this book", it can be inferred that God's message comes out as clearly as a text message.

4.) Similar to the fact that the reader brings his own opinion to the table in reading, a texter might also find elements in conversation that highlight what he/she wants to hear. (I probably could argue that this is just a better statement of what is meant by premise 1)

5.) During prayer, someone is really just talking to themselves.

6.) Since a texter, is reading what they want to... they are really just talking to themselves as well.

Therefore, textual conversation is like having a conversation with God.... you're really just talking to yourself.

Admittedly, premise 6 isn't as solid... I think pieces of that person still come through.  Whereas prayer is pretty much just you, but probably the only way to alleviate that is to say that the idea of praying came from the Bible and was taught by that person's parents, teacher, preacher, religious official, etc.  Thus, even the guy/girl praying is allowing a bit of someone else in as well.

 

Views: 13

Tags: Cell Phone, Prayer, Text Messaging

Comment by Cara Coleen on February 4, 2011 at 9:53pm

I would say receiving texts is like reading the Bible, more so than like having a "conversation" with God. Ha... 'cause at least you're not just driving down the road by yourself, having a full-on conversation with an imaginary friend that you think is responding to you (you can hear their voice in your head, after all).

 

Other than that, I would say it's a good argument; things are easily taken out of context, and people do often project their own thoughts or agenda into what they perceive. No wonder there are so many religions/denominations built around the same book! "You're so vain, I bet you think this song is about you!"

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