Book: "What Are You Without God" by Christopher Krzeminski

The subtitle of this book is "How to discredit religious thought and rebuild your identity."  You can find it easily on amazon.  The wording of the book is very complex, but not in such a way that it was difficult for me to follow.  After reading it for awhile, you realize that it has to be that way... the wording needs to be very precise, because if it's not it can be argued with.

The book doesn't leave any wiggle room.  From beginning to end, there is pretty much nothing any Christian can do to argue (unless of course they haven't been paying attention).  I've been an atheist for a long time now, so ordering this book could be seen as a quest to reinforce what I already believe.  Though, the good follow up to that is I have read the bible, and most atheists have (as the reason atheists are atheists is usually by informed logic).

Anyway, I was happy to have read this book because I can simply refer to it instead of explaining.  People are curious why I'm an atheist when I tell them I am, and explaining such a thing is tiresome... Christians have the liberty of referring to the bible, and now I am glad that I have a text to refer to as well.

I suppose it might also be a good book to try and convince someone to convert to atheism... but we all know that in order for that process to begin, they have to be on the fence to begin with, otherwise they will most likely stop reading at the first thing they can muster disagreement with (which is easy for people to do if they are really hell-bent on doing so).

Thanks for reading.

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Tags: Christopher, Krzeminski, are, god, what, without, you

Comment by captain kingsway on June 2, 2014 at 9:44am

Hi there, this is a hard subject to talk on;  The religious brain is conditioned usually from childhood so it has inbuilt PTSD damage mainly by the threat of HELL etc. When the condition is weakened by some other actions, it is possible the brain is at loss re no signals from the void etc, so that it is frustrated or worse mental problems use of drugs etc, 

Comment by Maxwell Marovich on June 2, 2014 at 10:30am

Haha, use of drugs?  I wouldn't say that can be tied to religious brains, since I have first-hand acquaintance with people who were druggies in their high school years, but then stopped because they had that "revelation." I could easily see them saying the same thing about atheists... and when you think about it, there is no evidence for a claim like that so you are guilty of doing what they do best (claim what is true out of thin air).

But I guess what I want to say is that the brain is a plastic organ... so no matter how they are conditioned as a child, there is always a chance to change their point of view, however slim.

In addition, to someone who is truly loyal to the Chrisian faith, the threat of hell is moot because faith absolves them from Hell, and the PTSD would only start after doubt has been cast.

But that brings me to the subtitle of this book, which is very important.  The book spends the first half making unbreakable logic chains against religion, and the second half is spent filling in that "void" that you speak of.  So hopefully any tendencies towards drugs is minimized lol.

Comment by Gallup's Mirror on June 2, 2014 at 11:03am

The book doesn't leave any wiggle room. From beginning to end, there is pretty much nothing any Christian can do to argue (unless of course they haven't been paying attention).

I'm sure that's true and I've ordered that book from the library myself. However...

It's not unusual to encounter a Christian apologist who insists upon a standard so credulous and degraded that observation, reason and falsification (the scientific standards) do not apply.

His claim, in other words, is that God is in a special category which requires no reason, evidence or other supported argument in the meaningful sense of the words. (Ask the Christian to explain why this is, and how he knows it, and you'll get woo-woo: "transcendent, miraculous, authoritative, self-revelation!")

People like that can always argue because their standard argument for God is based on irrationality, fallacy and ignorance (under which falls your aforementioned 'paying no attention').

Comment by Maxwell Marovich on June 2, 2014 at 7:22pm

You are totally right, Gallup's. But I suppose that is why it was so important for me to find a book that I could refer to so that I could spare myself the pain of arguing with someone whose "faith is big enough facts don't count."

I can save myself time and if there is any chance facts DO count, then the book will do the job for me, haha.  Not that I won't speak for myself if they ask any specific questions... but to the broad question of why I'm an atheist, I need an all-encompassing text.

If after you read the book, if you've encountered any books that do the job better, please let me know!  : )

Comment by Tom Sarbeck on June 8, 2014 at 5:08am

Christopher, I ordered a sample for my Kindle and a sentence in your preface's third paragraph impresses me mighty favorably: the book is a gift to your former self, a memento ... of what you would have needed to solve the puzzles that once trapped you.

Writers who say that do more than just write. They care about themselves and care about what they write.

When I finish a book I don't often thank its author. I might thank you.

Comment by James Cox on June 8, 2014 at 6:56pm

If you lie hard enough, the truth need never intrude!

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