I received a ticket today. As a government employee I am painfully aware how federal and state funding is at its annual end, and the police are prodded to extract revenue from the masses by playing a ridiculous game of numbers. Thirteen miles over the speed limit was the arbitrary number of the day. While in suburbanite cities such a speed could be hazardous to children at play; but on highways it is typically (as it was this day) the flow of traffic. The blue lights flicker and for a moment I feel as if I were a commodity.

It was only a month ago that two children were murdered around about a local apartment complex with no police to save them from their notoriously domestically abusive parents. From where I sit there are uninvestigated crimes committed by the residence within my neighborhood that are far from hidden away from the authorities. Drug sales, spousal violence, incestuous molestation, arson, and on infinitum with not a balking from those that vow to serve and protect. Instead, all the day long they slothfully lounge in their parked cars awaiting in hovels to pounce on the hard-working bill-paying citizenry. They have prostituted their souls to a capitalistic system where law and order has been whittled down to the lowest common denominator. The all mighty dollar.



Views: 8

Tags: Capitalism, Police, State

Comment by Kirk Holden on December 19, 2010 at 12:53pm

The police are to busy punching hippie weed smokers in the face because they might sell an ounce of pot to me.

Comment by Jason Paisley on December 19, 2010 at 5:19pm

I hardly think getting a ticket is an indictment of the "evils of capitalism". Where i live the rule is 10 miles over get pulled over on any road. You got caught...pay the ticket.

Comment by Cara Coleen on December 19, 2010 at 6:58pm

Yeah... I've definitely felt this way. There are much worse crimes being committed; traffic violations pale in comparison to what goes on in plain sight. But... I guess it doesn't actually pay to fight real crime. It's actually quite expensive.

Comment by Matt Coulthurst on December 19, 2010 at 7:17pm

"but on highways it is typically (as it was this day) the flow of traffic."

 

So are you saying that you were justified in breaking the law because everyone else was too?

 

From where I sit there are uninvestigated crimes committed by the residence within my neighborhood that are far from hidden away from the authorities. Drug sales, spousal violence, incestuous molestation, arson, and on infinitum with not a balking from those that vow to serve and protect

You have evidence of these horrendous crimes? Perhaps you should consider taking your evidence to the authories.

 

You know - if everyone stopped speeding, the police wouldn't have to devote their time to catching you.

Comment by Cara Coleen on December 19, 2010 at 9:03pm

C'mon Matt... it's no secret that there are heinous crimes being committed everyday that go un-prosecuted, maybe because they're in areas the authorities would rather avoid or are simply indifferent about. A lot of the laws in place are not practical and people (children a lot of times) remain in horrible situations because of stupid rules and regulations that should be circumvented in certain circumstances.

 

I don't really feel like going into all that. It's easy enough to discover how unjust our system is. I don't think Jason is trying to justify the fact that he's speeding, only that the reaction of the "justice" system is disproportionate to the crime, and clearly out to make a profit. It seems like they're always coming up with things to fine us for. Even when we're trying our hardest to register our vehicles, keep our insurance up to date, keep our addresses current, pay our bills, any lapse on our own part apparently is unforgivable and merits being fined ridiculous amounts of money. It doesn't matter when the banks make a mistake, or the city, or our employer; they get off without any penalties. But the average Joe is expected to be 100% all the time... or else

 

Comment by Matt Coulthurst on December 19, 2010 at 9:38pm

@Cara: Nowhere in his post does Michel reveal the extent of the ticket he received for speeding. There is no mention of how disproportionate the response was for his infraction - just a complaint that he was given a punishment for being caught breaking the law. I have inferred from the tone and text of the blog that Michel thinks that cops sit in there cars all day eating donuts & waiting for poor 'innocent' motorists to pounce upon.

 

I wonder if he is able to demonstrate how many law enforcement officers got into the job because they 'prostituted their souls to a capitalistic system'? Or, conversely and generously, how many didn't become law enforcement officers out of some sense of civic duty?

 

How much profit does your city make from ticketing speeding/traffic infractions?

 

My point was not that 'system' is just - it is that Michel seems to be of the opinion that the police officers who ticketed him would rather be doing that instead of dealing with real crimes, regardless of the fact that any officers on traffic duty are unlikely to be assigned to dealing with investigating the crimes he listed.

 

Regardless of how one feels about revenue gathering - you live in a democracy. There are plenty of options for making your voice heard about the ineffectiveness of law enforcement in your neighbourhood. If you are unhappy with the system - start doing something about it.

Comment by Malcolm on December 20, 2010 at 8:03am

Also, it is not a crime to drive the average speed of motorists around you, it is actually the safest speed.

 

And if everyone around you is doing 120 mph, then it is legal for you to do so as well? This is an interesting legal theory. Maybe in those neighborhoods where all these "serious crimes" go uninvestigated, maybe they aren't really crimes because they are so common.

 

The fact is, speeding is illegal. Now if you want to argue that the speed limits should be raised, that's a different matter, but even then I have a feeling that people would still exceed them by a certain margin.

 

 

Comment by Matt Coulthurst on December 20, 2010 at 6:29pm

Question: When government departments that have a revenue gathering function, such as police departments, get to 'that' part of the month (or year) and ramp up their efforts to generate revenue - where does that revenue go?

Comment by Michel Campbell on December 24, 2010 at 7:32am

It was not an indictment of the law.  I haven't had a ticket in years and I always pay my dues.  It was an indictment on our system of extracting more revenue rather than fighting crime.

The crimes in my neighborhood are like the crimes the police knew about when I lived in Los Angeles and they refused to fight, or crimes that were being committed in Mississippi that they refused to fight, and even now I work for an agency
that does likewise.  At least, for my part, I refuse to play those games.

I am going to write a book about how the federal agencies burn money and do nothing to justify their existence.  Free cars, free vacation filled classes, free computers, stuff you could never imagine.

But there is a nice hole people can stick their heads in if they like to think the government is always on the up and up.

Comment by Michel Campbell on December 24, 2010 at 7:33am
And by the way, the "flow of traffic" in this state is the speed limit.

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