An Apology on Behalf of Christians (article worth sharing)

What If Jesus Meant All That Stuff?

This radical Christian's ministry for the poor, The Simple Way, has gotten him in some trouble with his fellow Evangelicals. We asked him to address those who don't believe.

By Shane Claiborne

To all my nonbelieving, sort-of-believing, and used-to-be-believing friends: I feel like I should begin with a confession. I am sorry that so often the biggest obstacle to God has been Christians. Christians who have had so much to say with our mouths and so little to show with our lives. I am sorry that so often we have forgotten the Christ of our Christianity.

Forgive us. Forgive us for the embarrassing things we have done in the name of God.

The other night I headed into downtown Philly for a stroll with some friends from out of town. We walked down to Penn's Landing along the river, where there are street performers, artists, musicians. We passed a great magician who did some pretty sweet tricks like pour change out of his iPhone, and then there was a preacher. He wasn't quite as captivating as the magician. He stood on a box, yelling into a microphone, and beside him was a coffin with a fake dead body inside. He talked about how we are all going to die and go to hell if we don't know Jesus.

Some folks snickered. Some told him to shut the hell up. A couple of teenagers tried to steal the dead body in the coffin. All I could do was think to myself, I want to jump up on a box beside him and yell at the top of my lungs, "God is not a monster." Maybe next time I will.

The more I have read the Bible and studied the life of Jesus, the more I have become convinced that Christianity spreads best not through force but through fascination. But over the past few decades our Christianity, at least here in the United States, has become less and less fascinating. We have given the atheists less and less to disbelieve. And the sort of Christianity many of us have seen on TV and heard on the radio looks less and less like Jesus.

At one point Gandhi was asked if he was a Christian, and he said, essentially, "I sure love Jesus, but the Christians seem so unlike their Christ." A recent study showed that the top three perceptions of Christians in the U. S. among young non-Christians are that Christians are 1) antigay, 2) judgmental, and 3) hypocritical. So what we have here is a bit of an image crisis, and much of that reputation is well deserved. That's the ugly stuff. And that's why I begin by saying that I'm sorry.

Now for the good news.

I want to invite you to consider that maybe the televangelists and street preachers are wrong — and that God really is love. Maybe the fruits of the Spirit really are beautiful things like peace, patience, kindness, joy, love, goodness, and not the ugly things that have come to characterize religion, or politics, for that matter. (If there is anything I have learned from liberals and conservatives, it's that you can have great answers and still be mean... and that just as important as being right is being nice.)

The Bible that I read says that God did not send Jesus to condemn the world but to save it... it was because "God so loved the world." That is the God I know, and I long for others to know. I did not choose to devote my life to Jesus because I was scared to death of hell or because I wanted crowns in heaven... but because he is good. For those of you who are on a sincere spiritual journey, I hope that you do not reject Christ because of Christians. We have always been a messed-up bunch, and somehow God has survived the embarrassing things we do in His name. At the core of our "Gospel" is the message that Jesus came "not [for] the healthy... but the sick." And if you choose Jesus, may it not be simply because of a fear of hell or hope for mansions in heaven.

Don't get me wrong, I still believe in the afterlife, but too often all the church has done is promise the world that there is life after death and use it as a ticket to ignore the hells around us. I am convinced that the Christian Gospel has as much to do with this life as the next, and that the message of that Gospel is not just about going up when we die but about bringing God's Kingdom down. It was Jesus who taught us to pray that God's will be done "on earth as it is in heaven." On earth.

One of Jesus' most scandalous stories is the story of the Good Samaritan. As sentimental as we may have made it, the original story was about a man who gets beat up and left on the side of the road. A priest passes by. A Levite, the quintessential religious guy, also passes by on the other side (perhaps late for a meeting at church). And then comes the Samaritan... you can almost imagine a snicker in the Jewish crowd. Jews did not talk to Samaritans, or even walk through Samaria. But the Samaritan stops and takes care of the guy in the ditch and is lifted up as the hero of the story. I'm sure some of the listeners were ticked. According to the religious elite, Samaritans did not keep the right rules, and they did not have sound doctrine... but Jesus shows that true faith has to work itself out in a way that is Good News to the most bruised and broken person lying in the ditch.

It is so simple, but the pious forget this lesson constantly. God may indeed be evident in a priest, but God is just as likely to be at work through a Samaritan or a prostitute. In fact the Scripture is brimful of God using folks like a lying prostitute named Rahab, an adulterous king named David... at one point God even speaks to a guy named Balaam through his donkey. Some say God spoke to Balaam through his ass and has been speaking through asses ever since. So if God should choose to use us, then we should be grateful but not think too highly of ourselves. And if upon meeting someone we think God could never use, we should think again.

After all, Jesus says to the religious elite who looked down on everybody else: "The tax collectors and prostitutes are entering the Kingdom ahead of you." And we wonder what got him killed?

I have a friend in the UK who talks about "dirty theology" — that we have a God who is always using dirt to bring life and healing and redemption, a God who shows up in the most unlikely and scandalous ways. After all, the whole story begins with God reaching down from heaven, picking up some dirt, and breathing life into it. At one point, Jesus takes some mud, spits in it, and wipes it on a blind man's eyes to heal him. (The priests and producers of anointing oil were not happy that day.)

In fact, the entire story of Jesus is about a God who did not just want to stay "out there" but who moves into the neighborhood, a neighborhood where folks said, "Nothing good could come." It is this Jesus who was accused of being a glutton and drunkard and rabble-rouser for hanging out with all of society's rejects, and who died on the imperial cross of Rome reserved for bandits and failed messiahs. This is why the triumph over the cross was a triumph over everything ugly we do to ourselves and to others. It is the final promise that love wins.

It is this Jesus who was born in a stank manger in the middle of a genocide. That is the God that we are just as likely to find in the streets as in the sanctuary, who can redeem revolutionaries and tax collectors, the oppressed and the oppressors... a God who is saving some of us from the ghettos of poverty, and some of us from the ghettos of wealth.

In closing, to those who have closed the door on religion — I was recently asked by a non-Christian friend if I thought he was going to hell. I said, "I hope not. It will be hard to enjoy heaven without you." If those of us who believe in God do not believe God's grace is big enough to save the whole world... well, we should at least pray that it is.

Your brother,

Shane

Views: 434

Comment by Diana Prince on August 23, 2012 at 4:56pm

I'm still not interested in religion, but I'd say the apology was nice to hear and a long time comin'.

Comment by Rob Lippmann on August 23, 2012 at 9:08pm

Some good sentiments in this article and he seems well-meaning--but apology aside, the issue over Christian faith for nonbelievers is not Jesus or bad Christians, or whether God is love or not.

Ultimately it's that we don't believe his god exists. 

Comment by Diana Prince on August 23, 2012 at 10:44pm

It might not explain why we're atheists, but it might explain why we're antitheist. Many atheists don't just choose not to partake in religion -- a lot of them fiercely hate it and want to see it wiped from the face of the earth.

Comment by Doug Reardon on August 24, 2012 at 12:48am

Now, if only the Nazis would apologize for WWII.

Comment by Rob Lippmann on August 24, 2012 at 1:10am

If he's trying to reduce the dislike of Christianity many nonbelievers have that you rightly pointed out, an apology might be a start, and more believers like him that focus on constructive faith (well, what we would call constructive) would go even further.  But I'm questioning whether he'd still be tolerant of nonbelievers who accept his apology, respect his position, but continue to  disbelieve in his god.  My admittedly anecdotal experience with believers has not been positive on that score. 

Comment by Galen on August 24, 2012 at 4:50am

I loved the article and am grateful that at least some Christians can see what they're doing wrong (even by their own standards).  But aside from that, he's just plain wrong.  His god isn't love, peace, tolerance, etc.  His god really IS hatred and bile, as evidenced by the Bible.  Jesus was a radical because he was often saying the exact opposite of everything God had ever said before.  It would be like if Hitler's son devoted his life to caring for the Jews.  The Nazi belief isn't suddenly all about peace and love just because one important Nazi decided to pretend it is.

Comment by Diane on August 24, 2012 at 6:35am

I've heard similar apologies before and, although there is something bittersweet about them, they neither repair the damage that has been done in my life by Christians nor move me any closer to viewing Christianity as a viable approach to life for me.

It seems like just another approach to demonstrate that some Christians simply do not get it.  

Comment by James Cox on August 24, 2012 at 9:11am

Sadly, Shane can not speek for the whole edifice. To apologise, as a ruse, to make just one more attempt at a sale, seems very pointless.

Many of us have moved on, thanks to christians. Waking up from the christian 'dream', has been painful for some of us. Once I let the crazyness go, it got much easier....  

Comment by Dale Headley on August 24, 2012 at 3:31pm

Mr. Claiborne's lengthy apologia is quite articulate and eloquent; but it's moot, since it misses the salient point: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS GOD!

Comment by Dale Headley on August 24, 2012 at 3:32pm

Mr. Claiborne's apologia is quite articulate and eloquent; but it's moot, since it misses the salient point: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS GOD!

Comment

You need to be a member of Think Atheist to add comments!

Join Think Atheist

Forum

Why do we tolerate this?

Started by Belle Rose in Crime and Punishment. Last reply by Gary Clouse 29 minutes ago. 21 Replies

Ear-piercing a baby

Started by Simon Mathews in Atheist Parenting. Last reply by Davis Goodman 36 minutes ago. 2 Replies

In Defense of ‘Islamophobia’

Started by Brian Daurelle in Society. Last reply by Erock68la 4 hours ago. 201 Replies

Torture Report release today

Started by Unseen in Ethics & Morals. Last reply by Virgil 5 hours ago. 114 Replies

Blog Posts

Pabst Blue Ribbon to the rescue!

Posted by Ed on December 15, 2014 at 9:33pm 0 Comments

Finally, a cool billboard in Arkansas!

Posted by Ed on December 15, 2014 at 8:21am 2 Comments

Atheist Sites

Services we love!

We are in love with our Amazon

Book Store!

Gadget Nerd? Check out Giz Gad!

Advertise with ThinkAtheist.com

In need a of a professional web site? Check out the good folks at Clear Space Media

© 2014   Created by umar.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service