Recently I was in a debate on religion with ex-family members. And as always the theists were unable to argue away their inconsistencies or contradictions that are in the bible that shows it was written by men. The ending result like most debates on religion I've gotten into ended with this line "I'll believe what I want and you can believe what you want..."
This "right to belief" continued to bug me, but why?

I got to thinking, why does that not only bother me, but sounds odd. Now I realize that if this were true, religion would have died out hundreds of years ago. Well the theists don't actually believe in their statement  "I'll believe what I want and you can believe what you want...", why? because they still indoctrinate children. They don't actually believe that statement, it's just used to dodge what you already know. Believing is ok if you agree, if you don't agree irregardless of lack of evidence, because one person shouldn't force their beliefs on another. yeah seriously.

Almost every theist I know will quote this mantra over and over and over, in every debate they have. Each time knowing they actually don't agree with it or they view indoctrination/forcing their beliefs on young children as not actually forcing beliefs on others, kids aren't people with rights. The use of "right to beliefs" is actually a deceptive statement because they have no issues with forcing their beliefs on children, yet at the same time talking out of the other side of their face. They will actually argue people have a right to their beliefs. I'm wondering how any theist can rationalize this discrepancy. This extreme contradiction and act of deception.

So I think theists have one of two options, stop forcing their beliefs on others or accept that I have the right to force my beliefs on them. I'd rather them take the former option as I'm uncomfortable with forcing a belief. I'd rather liberate them from their bronze age religion and have them think on their own. But this has to come about through logic and reason.
I'll grant them something, they'll actually refuse to grant to their own children, freedom of thought and beliefs.

If I were to use the "right to belief", I could go be a medical doctor without medical school. I could claim to the medical boards and the hospital lawyers that I have the right to believe what I want and they can belief what they want. I believe I have the knowledge to practice medicine, therefore I have the right to practice medicine because nobody can force me to believe what they believe.  Yeah I wonder how that would work if people actual thought like that.

So next time you're in an argument with a theist, ask them if they believe that they have the  right or any person has a right to their own beliefs, thoughts and opinions. And when they answer a resounding "yes", ask them why they indoctrinate children who are unable to think for themselves, or why they cannot wait to teach the kids about religion until they get to an age where they can reason and understand and form their own beliefs as what it is. This should pose a problem to those theists who want to use their back door card "belief rights".  I'm curious as to their reply to this contradiction.

Views: 37

Comment by Mabel on August 19, 2012 at 8:29pm

So next time you're in an argument with a theist, ask them if they believe that they have the  right or any person has a right to their own beliefs, thoughts and opinions. And when they answer a resounding "yes", ask them why they indoctrinate children who are unable to think for themselves, or why they cannot wait to teach the kids about religion until they get to an age where they can reason and understand and form their own beliefs as what it is. This should pose a problem to those theists who want to use their back door card "belief rights".  I'm curious as to their reply to this contradiction.

@ JustNorrik - I'm not sure exactly what the reply would be but I bet it would be something very vague and very false. They are so convinced they're right, they would not even give pause to your reasoning. They just won't see it. I know how they are.

Comment by Thomas Marshall on August 19, 2012 at 11:37pm

"So I think theists have one of two options, stop forcing their beliefs on others or accept that I have the right to force my beliefs on them. I'd rather them take the former option as I'm uncomfortable with forcing a belief. I'd rather liberate them from their bronze age religion and have them think on their own. But this has to come about through logic and reason.
I'll grant them something, they'll actually refuse to grant to their own children, freedom of thought and beliefs."

@JustNorrik- I agree, and think this is a marvelous idea, however they do have the perfect con. They make things fun for the kids. Kids actually want to go to church because they get snacks, they get to color, sing songs, and make friends with other children. They become willing participants in their own misinformation.  They want to do this because its "fun," and because if they don't the big, bad boogey man will take them from their bed and throw them in fire and eternal anguish... but don't worry "Jesus loves you..."

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