Comment by archaeopteryx on July 4, 2013 at 7:49pm

Unlike the fact that I don't know how to control milk droplets (and ignoring the fact that I have no idea what a map of London looks like, so even if I COULD control milk droplets, I still couldn't pull it off), I CAN control my thought processes, to the extent that I can line up facts in a logical order and use those to arrive at a conclusion - much as Lewis did when he concluded that he couldn't trust his own thinking.

He created his own paradox when he reached that conclusion through a thought process he, himself, asserts he can't trust.

Comment by RobertPiano on July 5, 2013 at 10:11am

The guy got famous espousing circular logic. He is all about fairy tales. I love his writing.

Comment by Kamela Johnston on July 5, 2013 at 11:17am

I went to a Christian high school & part of the curriculum was an apologetics class where Lewis' "Mere Christianity" was the main text. After completing a passage from it we'd all say, "Yes! Of course! It's so obvious!" then congratulate each other for being miniature philosophers. He's probably the closest thing to a saint that the Protestant church has.

But after watching various Richard Dawkins lectures & through my endeavor to read "The God Delusion" I'm learning how frustrating it is to atheists when people say that evolution is "random." Dawkins gets quite worked up about it. And the fact is, probably after Lewis' time granted, we've made great strides in understanding the development of the brain. But even if we didn't, why is it more rational & logical to believe in the Creation story? But I, for one, was never encouraged to take Lewis' theories and think them through. Just learn them & accept them as fact, much like Scripture.

Comment by Nate Townsend on July 5, 2013 at 11:18am
Archaeopteryx: technically, he's averted the paradox, with something along the lines of "I can trust the thought process I used to deduce a God iff there is a God." Fascinating piece of self indoctrination.
Comment by archaeopteryx on July 5, 2013 at 11:41am

But the paradox lies in the fact that if he can't trust the thought processes that lead to atheism, he can also not trust the thought processes that lead to theism.

Actually, by that same token, he can't trust the thought processes that lead him to believe he can't trust his thought processes.

Comment by Simon Paynton on July 5, 2013 at 12:05pm

@Nate - but his implicit conclusion is, "there is a God". 

Comment by James Cox on July 5, 2013 at 1:02pm

Yes, but this is the 'conclusion' from a 'previous belief', not that of a rational argument.

If you are a 'previous belief' type of person C.S.Lewis might seem very reasonable and sensible. Sadly, if he 'believed' that 2+2=5, then 'God exists' might be a 'reasonable' result, baring the appearance of a moment of insight or independent thought. 

I have read atleast some of C.S. Lewis, mostly due to dares from theist friends. A few friends consider Lewis the 'cat's meow' in theist apologetics, and forgive him for excursions into fantasy science fiction. I figure that fantasy SF might be an indication of other tendencies towards other types of 'fiction', but I could be mis-taken...;p).

Comment by Strega on July 5, 2013 at 1:09pm

Actually, by that same token, he can't trust the thought processes that lead him to believe he can't trust his thought processes.

I like that a lot :)

Comment by James Cox on July 5, 2013 at 1:12pm

"But the paradox lies in the fact that if he can't trust the thought processes that lead to atheism, he can also not trust the thought processes that lead to theism.

Actually, by that same token, he can't trust the thought processes that lead him to believe he can't trust his thought processes."

Yes, and even a greater sadness could be discovered, If he realizes that his 'faith' is built upon an 'argument' that appears to be 'rational', then the mind behind the argument must be from the same poisened tree! Getting the 'faith' with his path taken, yields dust and emthy hands. Maybe the truth he is seeking, will be found by a nearly random string of words since nothing else seems helpful. 

Funny how the 'concept of god' seems like a Taoist bubble,'he who feels punctured....' 

Comment by James Cox on July 5, 2013 at 1:24pm

"I like that a lot :)  "

Maybe atheists should just stop worring about Lewis, but promote him as a 'perfect example theist kind". Like the old theists debating 'the number of angels dancing on the head of a pin?', surely our newer theists could/should be allowed to see Lewis as a 'deep thinker', and a perfect model for the 'intelligent believer'. Such an intellectual back waters could be created. I can see a school 'C.S. Lewis Theological Semenary', where our once best and brightest could go for Christ Fries, Propositional Pseudo-Logic Calculus, and Lewis Look-A-Like contests....

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