Salman Rushdie - paranoid Islam modern

"This paranoid Islam, which blames outsider, 'infidels', for all the ills of Muslim societies, and whose proposed remedy is the closing of those societies to the rival project of modernity, is presently the fastest growing version of Islam in the world." ~ Salman Rushdie

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Comment by Simon Paynton on February 3, 2016 at 8:20am

I'm sure he's right, but on the other hand, he's a stupid annoying silly fuck.  He wound up the Moslem world as hard as he could with "The Satanic Verses" and then wondered why they issued a fatwa to kill him.  Also, every time his present wife/girlfriend has a baby, he goes and has an affair because he feels left out.  Ta-da 

Comment by SteveInCO on February 3, 2016 at 9:49am

He wound up the Moslem world as hard as he could with "The Satanic Verses" and then wondered why they issued a fatwa to kill him.

Did he really wonder about it, or was he just appalled (and a bit afraid for his life perhaps)?

We should all be appalled at that.   There's simply no room in a civilized world for death threats over what someone said.

Comment by Simon Paynton on February 3, 2016 at 11:40am

I agree - it's not very sporting to issue orders to kill someone just because of a book they've written.  However, it wasn't at all clever of him to go all out to deliberately wind up the entire Muslim world, given that he knew full well what they are like.  I really think he was surprised, and he definitely was afraid for his life. 

It's like stamping on a lion's tail repeatedly and then it turns round and tries to bite your head off - a bit of a foolish thing to do under the circumstances. 

This image comes to mind 

Comment by TJ on February 3, 2016 at 2:47pm

Well, I guess, Simon, that you're feeling is that no one should be able to write something that might anger a party, or, only if that party is also famous for wanting to kill people who anger them?

I ask, because if everyone clams up and won't speak for fear of retaliation, the bad guys can give the impression that everyone agrees with them, and, dissonant opinions a person might have had, get suppressed, so as to avoid seeming like a salient target for everyone else.

When people voice their dissent, OTHER people hear that voice, and KNOW that they are not alone.

A coward dies a thousand deaths, a brave man but once.

:D

Comment by Simon Paynton on February 3, 2016 at 3:18pm

"you're feeling is that no one should be able to write something that might anger a party, or, only if that party is also famous for wanting to kill people who anger them?

- what I'm saying is don't be surprised when it blows up in one's face, as Rushdie plainly was.  If someone wants to deliberately piss off Muslims, like Charlie Hebdo, good luck to them, and be prepared for the consequences, as they were.

Comment by TJ on February 3, 2016 at 6:26pm

I suppose that normally would have gone without saying though.

The writer was using Candide-like approach to the characters TO make a point about good and evil...and, sure, he knew it would cause those with a vested interest in making others believe as they do, or die, angry....and, did it to make the statement despite the risk.

This was not a case of a schmuck accidentally pissing some people off, this was more along the lines of lobbing a grenade at the enemy, and then taking cover when they fired back.

He knew exactly what he was doing, and that to kill hornets, the nest sometimes rallies against you.

Comment by Simon Paynton on February 4, 2016 at 4:59am

I agree that bully boys need to be overcome. 

I beg to differ about Salman Rushdie: from hearing about the situation from a UK perspective, he really was surprised when it all went so badly wrong.  Hence the extensive derogatory description. 

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