Atheists who love Science!

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Atheists who love Science!

A group for science enthusiasts of all types -- professionals, amateurs, students, anybody who loves science.

Website: http://www.thinkatheist.com/group/science
Members: 923
Latest Activity: on Wednesday

Discussion Forum

CuriosityStream, anyone?

Started by Pope Beanie. Last reply by Pope Beanie on Wednesday. 1 Reply

Neanderthals used fire in caves:

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Unseen Jun 8. 8 Replies

Fossil Dog

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Unseen Jun 8. 13 Replies

Pre-Clovis civilization in Florida

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Belle Rose May 15. 4 Replies

Teeth vs. Tools

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Apr 28. 2 Replies

‘Trickle of food’

Started by JadeBlackOlive Apr 15. 0 Replies

Diet affects the evolution of birds

Started by JadeBlackOlive Apr 14. 0 Replies

How Dinosaurs Grew From Hatchlings to Adults

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Apr 6. 18 Replies

Think your DNA is all human?

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by SteveInCO Mar 27. 9 Replies

Small, Brainy T-Rex Discovered

Started by JadeBlackOlive Mar 14. 0 Replies

Fossil analysis pushes back human split

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Reg The Fronkey Farmer Mar 11. 3 Replies

Mysterious cosmic radio bursts found to repeat

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Mar 3. 2 Replies

Jawless fish brains

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Feb 16. 4 Replies

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Comment by CelestialTeapot on July 18, 2013 at 12:59pm

Check out our science issue: Science: the Good, the Bad & the Weird! We've got: Noetic Science, Stem Cells & the Future, Immortal Jellyfish, Bad Medicine, Atheist Stereotypes & more. 

http://www.celestialteapotmagazine.com/

Comment by ɐuɐz ǝllǝıuɐp on July 2, 2013 at 6:53pm
Comment by RockyTIJ on March 7, 2013 at 11:21pm
Comment by Pope Beanie on November 27, 2012 at 1:17pm


Humanity’s last invention and our uncertain future


Credit: Jason A. Samfield from Flickr

A philosopher, a scientist and a software engineer have come together to propose a new centre at Cambridge to address developments in human technologies that might pose “extinction-level” risks to our species, from biotechnology to artificial intelligence.


In 1965, Irving John ‘Jack’ Good sat down and wrote a paper for New Scientist called Speculations concerning the first ultra-intelligent machine. Good, a Cambridge-trained mathematician, Bletchley Park cryptographer, pioneering computer scientist and friend of Alan Turing, wrote that in the near future an ultra-intelligent machine would be built.

This machine, he continued, would be the “last invention” that mankind will ever make, leading to an “intelligence explosion” – an exponential increase in self-generating machine intelligence. For Good, who went on to advise Stanley Kubrick on 2001: a Space Odyssey, the “survival of man” depended on the construction of this ultra-intelligent machine.

Fast forward almost 50 years and the world looks very different. Computers dominate modern life across vast swathes of the planet, underpinning key functions of global governance and economics, increasing precision in healthcare, monitoring identity and facilitating most forms of communication – from the paradigm shifting to the most personally intimate. Technology advances for the most part unchecked and unabated.

While few would deny the benefits humanity has received as a result of its engineering genius – from longer life to global networks – some are starting to question whether the acceleration of human technologies will result in the survival of man, as Good contended, or if in fact this is the very thing that will end us.

Now a philosopher, a scientist and a software engineer have come together to propose a new centre at Cambridge, the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk (CSER), to address these cases – from developments in bio and nanotechnology to extreme climate change and even artificial intelligence – in which technology might pose “extinction-level” risks to our species.

Read rest of article here.

With so much at stake, we need to do a better job of understanding the risks of potentially catastrophic technologies."


—Huw Price
Comment by Pope Beanie on September 16, 2011 at 2:01am

Bioethicists Offer Reward For Proof On HPV Vaccine Claim

Even as Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann backs off some from an inflammatory claim that a vaccine to prevent cervical cancer led to mental retardation in a young girl, two bioethicists are turning up the heat.

...

...Dr. Steven Miles, a bioethicist at the University of Minnesota, has ponied up $1,000 if the mother Bachmann talked about can produce medical proof that her daughter suffered mental retardation from the HPV vaccine, the Star Tribune reports. "These types of messages in this climate have the capacity to do enormous public health harm," Miles told the paper. "It's an extremely serious claim and it deserves to be analyzed."

And Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at the University of Pennsylvania has placed what amounts to a $10,000 bet on the issue. He, too, wants proof of the claim and described his wager with Bachmann on Twitter...


Read and/or listen to whole story here.

 

Comment by Jaume on July 15, 2011 at 5:51am

When we find an arrow head we can see that something created it. The chances of an arrow head being created by some rocks falling down a cliff and hitting each other just right are just astronomical so we assume that it was created by man an intelligent designer.

 

When we find Jesus' face on a dog's butt we can see that something created it. The chances of Jesus' face on a dog's butt being created by some hair growing around its ass and being colored just right are just astronomical so we assume that it was created by man an intelligent designer.

Comment by RockyTIJ on July 14, 2011 at 5:40pm

Dallas,

Mind-boggling, ain't it?

Six words:

    Blinded by the veil of faith.

Take care,

Rocky

Comment by Jon van Rooyen on June 16, 2011 at 12:40pm

Currently reading "The Canon: The beautiful basics of Science" by Natalie Angier. Awesome book so far! Just wanted to share a quote I came across in it that I particularly like. Natalie is speaking of how a lot of people (including many scientists) dispute certain theories because they believe it is a matter of opinion or bias.

The quote:

"Those of us who are not overly philosophical believe that there is a reality to nature but that it can be very hard to see it and understand it, given all our biases" - Elliot Meyerowitz

It's a simple thing really, but I think if more people understood the difference between scientific fact (supported by evidence) and opinion, we may just break through to the next level in our understanding of the universe. I fear we as "intelligent" humans may be quite far off from that, however.

Comment by Victor on May 12, 2011 at 8:52pm

Well, for atheists who love science and know some spanish, here is my blog: https://mtabok.wordpress.com/

Bye!

Comment by Pope Beanie on February 24, 2011 at 10:46pm
Wouldn't it be terribly ironic if Afro-Asian countries kept their oil and burned it for desalinization plants, food farms, and air conditioning while the rest of us just dried up and shriveled away.
 

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