Atheists who love Science!

Information

Atheists who love Science!

A group for science enthusiasts of all types -- professionals, amateurs, students, anybody who loves science.

Website: http://www.thinkatheist.com/group/science
Members: 924
Latest Activity: 14 hours ago

Discussion Forum

Pre-Clovis civilization in Florida

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Belle Rose May 15. 4 Replies

Fossil Dog

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Unseen May 13. 4 Replies

Teeth vs. Tools

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Apr 28. 2 Replies

‘Trickle of food’

Started by JadeBlackOlive Apr 15. 0 Replies

Diet affects the evolution of birds

Started by JadeBlackOlive Apr 14. 0 Replies

How Dinosaurs Grew From Hatchlings to Adults

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Apr 6. 18 Replies

Think your DNA is all human?

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by SteveInCO Mar 27. 9 Replies

Small, Brainy T-Rex Discovered

Started by JadeBlackOlive Mar 14. 0 Replies

Fossil analysis pushes back human split

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Reg The Fronkey Farmer Mar 11. 3 Replies

Mysterious cosmic radio bursts found to repeat

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Mar 3. 2 Replies

Jawless fish brains

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by JadeBlackOlive Feb 16. 4 Replies

Fossils turn out to be a rich source of information

Started by JadeBlackOlive. Last reply by Pope Beanie Feb 10. 5 Replies

Child with cat eyes 'he can see in the dark'

Started by Hope. Last reply by Chris Thomas Nov 19, 2015. 5 Replies

This RSS Feed

Loading… Loading feed

Comment Wall

Comment

You need to be a member of Atheists who love Science! to add comments!

Comment by JadeBlackOlive on March 11, 2016 at 1:32am

Great beauty there, Stephen.

Comment by Stephen on March 10, 2016 at 9:47pm

Beautiful and relaxing, just awe inspiring.  

Comment by Pope Beanie on September 7, 2015 at 6:41pm

Surprising giant ring-like structure in the universe

September 7, 2015 by Tomasz Nowakowski

[...]

"The researchers found a ring of nine gamma ray bursts (GRBs)—the most luminous events in the universe—about 5 billion light years in diameter, and having a nearly regular circular shape, noting that there is a one in 20,000 probability of the GRBs being in this distribution by chance."

[...]


Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2015-09-giant-ring-like-universe.html#jCp

Comment by Pope Beanie on May 15, 2015 at 7:07pm

Comment by Pope Beanie on December 13, 2014 at 5:48pm

Link between vitamin D and dementia risk confirmed

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a substantially increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older people, according to the most robust study of its kind ever conducted.

An international team, led by Dr David Llewellyn at the University of Exeter Medical School, found that study participants who were severely Vitamin D deficient were more than twice as likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Comment by Pope Beanie on March 3, 2014 at 3:48am

UCLA study finds robotic-assisted prostate surgery offers better cancer control

Jim Hu
Dr. Jim Hu
An observational study from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has found that prostate cancer patients who undergo robotic-assisted prostate surgery have fewer instances of cancer cells at the edge of their surgical specimen and less need for additional cancer treatments like hormone or radiation therapy than patients who have traditional "open" surgery.
 

(read whole article)

 
The team also assessed the use of additional cancer therapies — a hormone therapy known as androgen deprivation, as well as radiation — after robotic surgery and open surgery.
 
They found that robotic prostate surgery was associated with 5 percent fewer positive margins (13.6 percent vs. 18.3 percent); this difference was greater for patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer. Patients who had robotic surgery also had a one-third reduction in the likelihood of needing additional cancer therapies within 24 months after surgery.
 
Despite the greater up-front cost of robotic surgery, the findings show that the procedure may translate into less downstream costs and fewer side effects from radiation and hormone therapy, the researchers said.
Comment by CelestialTeapot on July 18, 2013 at 12:59pm

Check out our science issue: Science: the Good, the Bad & the Weird! We've got: Noetic Science, Stem Cells & the Future, Immortal Jellyfish, Bad Medicine, Atheist Stereotypes & more. 

http://www.celestialteapotmagazine.com/

Comment by ɐuɐz ǝllǝıuɐp on July 2, 2013 at 6:53pm
Comment by RockyTIJ on March 7, 2013 at 11:21pm
Comment by Pope Beanie on November 27, 2012 at 1:17pm


Humanity’s last invention and our uncertain future


Credit: Jason A. Samfield from Flickr

A philosopher, a scientist and a software engineer have come together to propose a new centre at Cambridge to address developments in human technologies that might pose “extinction-level” risks to our species, from biotechnology to artificial intelligence.


In 1965, Irving John ‘Jack’ Good sat down and wrote a paper for New Scientist called Speculations concerning the first ultra-intelligent machine. Good, a Cambridge-trained mathematician, Bletchley Park cryptographer, pioneering computer scientist and friend of Alan Turing, wrote that in the near future an ultra-intelligent machine would be built.

This machine, he continued, would be the “last invention” that mankind will ever make, leading to an “intelligence explosion” – an exponential increase in self-generating machine intelligence. For Good, who went on to advise Stanley Kubrick on 2001: a Space Odyssey, the “survival of man” depended on the construction of this ultra-intelligent machine.

Fast forward almost 50 years and the world looks very different. Computers dominate modern life across vast swathes of the planet, underpinning key functions of global governance and economics, increasing precision in healthcare, monitoring identity and facilitating most forms of communication – from the paradigm shifting to the most personally intimate. Technology advances for the most part unchecked and unabated.

While few would deny the benefits humanity has received as a result of its engineering genius – from longer life to global networks – some are starting to question whether the acceleration of human technologies will result in the survival of man, as Good contended, or if in fact this is the very thing that will end us.

Now a philosopher, a scientist and a software engineer have come together to propose a new centre at Cambridge, the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk (CSER), to address these cases – from developments in bio and nanotechnology to extreme climate change and even artificial intelligence – in which technology might pose “extinction-level” risks to our species.

Read rest of article here.

With so much at stake, we need to do a better job of understanding the risks of potentially catastrophic technologies."


—Huw Price
 
 
 

© 2016   Created by umar.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service