There is no specific vegetarian diet for vegans and vegetarians.. So, I'm just collecting some information here about vegan & vegetarian foods and type 2 diabetes..  I can and I hope I'm sharing which may benefit you here.. 

Not: You should ask your dietitian before switching to vegetarianism and veganism..

   Diabetic Vegan Diet

Based on the evidence that the incidence of diabetes is lower in vegetarians, some studies have investigated vegan interventions.

These studies have shown that a vegan diet may be effective in managing type 2 diabetes.

Switching diabetics to a vegan diet lowered hemoglobin A1C and LDL levels.

A vegan diet may improve blood filterability. Vegan diets may lower advanced glycation endproducts.

Some of the protection that vegetarian diets provide may come from the diet's protection against obesity.

 


The exchange nutritional system

 

What is the exchange system?

The exchange system is the system that allowed people to swap foods of similar nutritional value (e.g. carbohydrate) for another, so, for example, if wishing to have more than normal carbohydrates for dessert, one could cut back on potatoes in one's first course.

 Fruits and Vegetables


What about the exchange system in the vegan meals?

The vegan meals were made from unrefined vegetables, grains, beans, and fruits, with no refined ingredients, such as vegetable oil, white flour, or white pasta. These meals averaged just 10 percent fat (as a percentage of calories) and 80 percent complex carbohydrate. They also offered 60-70 grams of fiber per day and had no cholesterol at all.

The comparison (ADA) diet contained somewhat more plant-based ingredients than the average American diet, but still relied on the conventional chicken and fish recipes. This diet was 30 percent fat and 50 percent carbohydrate. It provided about 30 grams of fiber and 200 milligrams of cholesterol per day.

Participants in both groups came to the University two evenings per week for group sessions covering nutrition, cooking, and support.

There were several challenges in planning the study. Would persons with diabetes—and their partners—volunteer for the study? Would they change their eating habits and maintain the study program for the full three months? Could we find caterers who would dependably prepare and deliver attractive vegan and ADA meals?

 

How Does the System Work?

The exchange system groups similar kinds of foods into various exchange lists—for instance, there's a fruit list, a vegetable list, a starch list, and others. Portion sizes are specified for each food. You should be able to "exchange" any food on a list for another food on the same list, because they are designed to have the same amount of calories, carbs, fat, and so on.

The starch list, for example, includes bread, tortillas, pasta, rice and starchy vegetables like potatoes. Each serving provides approximately the same nutrients, and they are all interchangeable in your meal plan.

Your meal plan tells you how many servings from specific lists you can have at each meal. Meeting with a registered dietitian is the best way to help you individualize the plan and to determine the calorie count and distribution of meals that are right for you.

If you've been frightened by expectations of a diet that tells you what you can't eat, you'll be delighted to discover that new, popular options are available on today's exchange lists. This versatility, while not all-inclusive, provides plenty of choices and will help you adhere to the plan.

Those who don't know the difference between a carb and a calorie soon learn. The exchange system shows that carbohydrates, which raise blood glucose, come in a variety of packages. This system, which helps to build a balanced meal plan, has optimal nutrition built into it. Following your plan is a living experiment that takes nutrition out of the textbook and puts it on the table. 

                                                                Fruits and Vegetables

                           

Vegen Diet

Diabetes: Can a Vegan Diet Reverse Diabetes? 

Diabetes is not necessarily a one-way street. Early studies suggest that persons with type 2 diabetes can improve and, in some cases, even reverse the disease by switching to an unrefined, vegan diet. Unfortunately, none of these studies included a comparison group. So the Diabetes Action and Research Education Foundation provided a grant to PCRM to perform a carefully controlled test.

Working with Georgetown University, we compared two different diets: a high-fiber, low-fat, vegan diet and the more commonly used American Diabetes Association (ADA) diet. We invited persons with non-insulin-dependent diabetes and their spouses or partners to follow one of the two diets for three months. Caterers prepared take-home lunches and dinners, so participants could simply heat up the food at home.

The vegan meals were made from unrefined vegetables, grains, beans, and fruits, with no refined ingredients, such as vegetable oil, white flour, or white pasta. These meals averaged just 10 percent fat (as a percentage of calories) and 80 percent complex carbohydrate. They also offered 60-70 grams of fiber per day and had no cholesterol at all.

The comparison (ADA) diet contained somewhat more plant-based ingredients than the average American diet, but still relied on the conventional chicken and fish recipes. This diet was 30 percent fat and 50 percent carbohydrate. It provided about 30 grams of fiber and 200 milligrams of cholesterol per day.

Participants in both groups came to the University two evenings per week for group sessions covering nutrition, cooking, and support.

There were several challenges in planning the study. Would persons with diabetes—and their partners—volunteer for the study? Would they change their eating habits and maintain the study program for the full three months? Could we find caterers who would dependably prepare and deliver attractive vegan and ADA meals?

www.diabeteshealth.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetic_diet

                                                              Fruits and Vegetables

 

Is there a vegan or vegetarian food exchange list for diabetes diet...

 Fruits and Vegetables

Resources for Vegetarian Type 2 Diabetes Diet,

If you need more information on foods, or whole recipes, which don't appear on the American Dietetic Association Food Exchange Lists, go to Nutrition Data and find the nutrient data. Then you'll have a good idea whether or not that's a good food to lower your cholesterol and control your type 2 diabetes.

 Fruits and Vegetables

Here's a quote from Vegetarian Resource Group: "If you are looking for information regarding vegetarianism and diabeties, there is an article in the Winter 1999 issue of Vegetarian Dietetics, 'Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Managed Effectively with a Vegetarian Diet,'

                                                                   

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Tags: diet, nutrition

Views: 510

Replies to This Discussion

It is annoying because it is the truth. You can have your own opinions but not facts Robert. Tell me what is wrong with lentils or tofu. I don't believe anything you're saying as there are millions of type 1 diabetics who are doing fine with vegan/vegetarian diets. You can even go to the Ada website to check it out. I don't care what you eat because you can do what you want, it isyour body,but when people like you and heather make up bullshit, I like to call you guys on it.

Again you are insinuating that Robert must supply a list of some sort of toxins not found in meat - but it's the challenge of obtaining a balanced diet without meat that is the issue.  You seem unable to process this, however.

Also, speaking of bullshit, you make the claim that millions of type 1 diabetics live healthy lives on the vegan diet.  It would seem that the incidence of type one diabetes is roughly 0.02%, so that would give us a worldwide type 1 diabetic population of roughly 1.4 million.

Now, I realize that you can't process facts, so you will refuse to retract your statement.  Everyone else, here, however, realizes that there aren't millions of type 1 diabetics world wide, nor are they all eating a vegan/vegetarian diet.

I will consider continuing with you if you can show enough rationality to at least admit you mis-spoke when you made that statement.  Otherwise we are done and I'll leave your proven irrationality as a testament to any advice you give on diet in the future.

As Robert has pointed out, Hope, a vegan diet can do serious damage to an insulin dependent person.  I have a friend who is blind because of becoming a vegan while insulin dependent.  The studies you've provided developed very strict diets that DID take into account glycemic-index of the foods.

The vegan diet poses nutritional challenges that the average person lacks the intellect to overcome.  In the case of insulin dependence it can become a life altering/threatening challenge.  Take EXTREME precaution with radical diets like a vegan diet if you are insulin dependent.

can u please give the name of the person as i would like to meet him or talk to him over the net,

I won't quote her name on an open forum, but I can try to arrange for a chat between the two of you.  You'll likely need to phone, however, since her computer skills aren't that great and she's, well, blind.  I have to say in advance, however, that given your history of calling people liars and just sticking with your ideology regardless of facts, I am rather reticent to allow you to start phoning and harassing my friend with your bizarre dietary religious proselytizing.

i would love to give her a call. set it up.

I'll be waiting until I see whether or not you can actually speak English well enough to comprehend what I've been saying here.  Your obstinate ignorance is very theistic.  You can message me with your phone number, though, to get things started.

Heather, I do understand your offense, but it is so hard to get it right, you wouldn't believe.  Instead of relying so heavily on fruit, it's best to go for carbs-free vegetables to bulk out the diet and even out the blood sugar.  And why I'm not blind by now, I have no idea. 

I acknowledge that it is possible to maintain a balanced diet that is entirely animal product free - although there are challenges that typically require supplements for certain vitamins and also histidine.

The trouble is that few people who hop on the Vegan bandwagon ever educate themselves on these matters.  This is compounded by cultist vegans who make wild magical claims about their diet such as how it can 'cure' diabetes.  If your pancreas is shriveled up and dead, such claims are akin to Jesus restoring sight to a blind man by touch.

The benefits of a few ounces of fish/meat with each meal to the glycemic-digestive-profile is extremely beneficial in regulating blood sugars.  If non-processed fish/meat products are chosen, there is no significant health drawback, and also no need to supplement the diet with synthesized nutrients.

There are a lot of people out there who can barely manage their blood sugars on a regular diet.  Promising them great health on a radical diet that requires a lot more education to safely follow is just imprudent and runs along the lines of faith healers telling people to pray rather than take medication, in my opinion.

Yes, balanced, absolutely. Otherwise you'll just be falling over every five minutes.

There is no such a diet in the world can cure diabetes... But these diets are just made to control blood sugar, Cholesterol.. etc..

Plus, I totally agree with you Heather, that it's possible to maintain a balanced diet that is entirely animal product free...

Also, the glycemic index needs to be balanced and there are many tips to control your blod suger like, adding fiber into high glycemic meals will help slow down that undesirable spike of blood glucose..

 

@Hope

As I was saying, a vegan diet typically requires supplements as well as much more understanding of nutrition than a diet that includes moderate amounts of lean animal products.

When you talk about 'reversing' diabetes it would be far more accurate to specify that you are talking about staving the onset of insulin dependance - otherwise you are suggesting that the pancreas can be resuscitated after it has failed.  Two children nearly died in the last town in which I lived because of parents who believed such new age poppycock - and afterwards the homeopath who advised them got off by pointing out that he had told them he wasn't a doctor.

There is no good reason to eliminate all animal products from your diet and suggesting such radical dietary changes will provide some miracle 'cure' is the sort of unscrupulous practice that I would only expect from the religious.

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