What tone/style do you usually utilize in your blog posts?
Biting sarcasm? Peaceful discussion? Point-by-point essay? Objective journalism? Diary entry? All of the above?

I ask because I've noticed certain blogs having a particular voice and attitude, and I wonder if you think this affects the level of activity in your comments, number of readers, or the level of discussion (respectful dialog vs. trolling, for example).

Your thoughts?

Tags: blogging, writing

Views: 2

Replies to This Discussion

I do both satire and serious. When I write essays they can be humorous and journalistic or more on the creative non-fiction side of things. Occasionally a bit of Rant edges in - but when I find myself writing in a ranty mood I spend extra time revising to ensure that it is as clear and concise as possible. When I write satirically - sometimes it flows like milk and honey - and other times I force myself to write satirically to keep myself from taking something too seriously - and then it is Hard Work. If anything, I've learned how difficult it is to write good Satire - but I love the challenge.

I don't get many trolls. I usually respond to trolls with Gesundheit - or - Thank you - or - You are loved. I have faithful readers who comment and their comments often reflect the post's tone. Often a post will trigger something from their own experience that they need/want to share - and that is good.

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