...a couple staffers had been armed?

Tags: control, gun, guns, killings, mass

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I would never say "I'm smart." 

No. But you would (and did) cite your membership in the too-smart-for-you club while belittling those who disagree. Your words:

"[H]ere at TA we're a little smarter than to fall for that one"

    were delivered in the same post that also included:  

"...it's rather, um, dumb to think that..."

   and most tellingly:

"...the arguments used by those opposed to gun ownership are almost invariably stupider than the ones used by the NRA..."

If I cite I have background and experience in an area where it's relevant and apply logic to discussions, that is being aggressive and/or bullying? How is that? 

You didn't "apply logic". You lied about my comments, accused me falsely of misrepresenting yours, added a couple of insults, and ducked when I asked you to explain your "sense".  I described this behavior previously as lacking integrity. Aggressive is less accurate but it'll do. 

He does express himself like a boy, an observation I'm sure other adults here have thought.

However he was expressing himself he treated you no worse in this exchange than you've been treating others. 

Well, gee, I'm sorry you see it that way.

Do we need to draw a picture?

There's always talk of gun control after a mass shooting and the Sandy Hook Elementary school massacre in Connecticut is no different. I would be surprised, however, if two weeks from now any progress has been made on placing restrictions on gun ownership.

And even if, later, some legislation has been proposed and eventually enacted, I'd be surprised if much of the legislation survives the gauntlet of Federal Courts and ACLU. On June 28, 2010, the Supreme Court ruled that strict handgun regulations in Chicago were unconstitutional. On a side note, Chicago has been experiencing a flood of gun murders this year. 

Now, the ACLU's policy is that it takes no position on gun control one way or the other. A closer look (here on a site run by gun control opponents), reveals that they tend to agree with gun control. HOWEVER, when it comes to requiring psychological evaluations, which many people want purchasers to pass before buying a gun, I suspect they will draw a line there even if they won't oppose other restrictions.

Personally, I'm not opposed to gun control. I just don't think it'll help much. It will be about as effective as our laws against exceeding the speed limit or smoking pot.

Here's something seldom discussed about gun control laws. They are almost entirely about purchasing and owning guns. 

If you want to massacre people, you don't need to own the gun, you just need to HAVE it! A lot of inner city mayhem is done with stolen guns, and the Sandy Hook shooter shot up the school with a gun he didn't own. His mother did.

Great point. We are discussing what is epidemic type problem and we are discussing anecdotal examples, idea skeeting, and single solutions instead of using all available options to approach a multifaceted issue.

Perhaps the mother was simply exercising her Constitution right to bear arms. Perhaps she did not feel comfortable or safe in her house with out a gun. Perhaps she liked to hunt or target shoot. Whatever her motivations, I would like to see how difficult it was for this kid to get to the guns, and if it was easy, then she does not appear qualified, trained or have the common sense to handle guns at her house. If she didn't feel comfortable in her own home with out a gun well that's seems ridiculous to me. I have an aluminum baseball bat and feel quite comfortable not having to go further than that. So lets address the cultural issues that people insist on having a gun when there is no reasonable statistical need or likelihood that you would ever need to use it in a deadly force scenario.

If I hear home invasion mentioned one more time I'm going to puke. The low statistical likelihood of that happening to you, the lower statistical likelihood the the guy won't just take your shit and leave, and the even lower statistical likelihood that it will end in your death or the death of a family member, does not seem to weigh very logically against 10 million gun sales in 2011 and 31,347 gun deaths in 2011.

I wonder if there's any reason why the bulk of kids the shooter shot were little girls? 

ALL of the dead teachers are female, but I suppose in any typical elementary school most of the teachers would be female, so that's less remarkable.

There's always talk of gun control after a mass shooting and the Sandy Hook Elementary school massacre in Connecticut is no different. I would be surprised, however, if two weeks from now any progress has been made on placing restrictions on gun ownership.

And even if, later, some legislation has been proposed and later enacted, I'd be surprised if much of the legislation survives the gauntlet of Federal Courts and ACLU.

Now, the ACLU's policy is that it takes no position on gun control one way or the other. A closer look (here on a site run by gun control opponents), reveals that they tend to agree with gun control. HOWEVER, when it comes to requiring psychological evaluations, which many people want purchasers to pass before buying a gun, I suspect they will draw a line there even if they won't oppose other restrictions.

I think that a psychological evaluation is creating a bit of a false dichotomy here. There are many ways to intercept potential danger. It can be as simple as a conversation. I go over the border to Canada regularly and get some of the most inane questions asked to me. I am sure the content of the questions is unimportant and the banter is meaningless.

They are looking for signs. If we had a comprehensive system to monitor the sales of firearms and ammunition, we could have watched that guy in Colorado buy 6,000 rounds of ammo in a period of time and someone could have shown up on his doorstep and had a conversation with him and potentially picked up on signs to indicate further investigation or questions were needed. Would that have prevented Newtown, no, but the are other approaches to be used and combined they would be successful.

Actually Marc, with Little George W's Patriot Act (so cleverly named, so that anyone who questioned it, would seem unpatriotic) in place, to the extent that even our library book choices are being catalogued, that the purchase of 6,000 rounds of amunition wouldn't have set off some bells and whistles SOMEwhere!

Do other countries have border crossing question lists? How effective are the questions? What are the guards looking for generally?

I expect that '20 questions', might not be an easy game with a fellow trying to rush a security line/door. Getting at a 'problem', that has a low probability, but potential  high fatality, becomes very expensive, with limited return, unless some inexpensive warning evaluation could be found or imposed.

Is there image processing software that might look for biometric indicators? Could metal detectors, with some basic imaging capability be applied? Are there any body scanners that might offer an alarm, that could then call for a frisk, but passing most everyone else.

Is this a 'problem', with no reasonable solution, or one that demands some new or reapplied technical fix?      

Leaving the US I think they are looking to see you are who you say you are and there is an issue with male parents taking their children out of the country and back to whatever country the father is from when their marriage to a US woman breaks up.

My friend works for the DEA and he says coming into the country there is big issue with pot being smuggled in from Canada and big sums of cash being brought into the country coming from questionable sources.

They caught a guy coming into the country because he looked nervous when he was asked the questions and they found he had a false floor in his 18 wheeler and the whole floor of the freight area was lined with pot.

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