http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2010-02-08/are-model...

-Lisa Hilton, The Daily Beast

With New York Fashion Week kicking off tomorrow, expect the usual criticism of models being too thin. But the truth, says Lisa Hilton, is that
these models are powerful, professional women just like athletes and
that obesity, not anorexia, is the real health disaster.

Another spring, another show season. In the mercurial world of fashion, it's comforting to know that some things will never change—Anna Wintour's hairdo, an Olsen in the front row, and a tsunami
of earnest media coverage on how a conspiracy of evil designers and
foolish models are reducing women to jutting-collarboned wrecks, barely
able to lift their heads from the lavatory bowl to make it to Barneys
in time for the pre-collections.

What's Wrong With Skinny?









With New York Fashion Week kicking off tomorrow, expect the usual criticism of models being too thin. But the truth, says Lisa Hilton, is that
these models are powerful, professional women just like athletes and
that obesity, not anorexia, is the real health disaster.

Another spring, another show season. In the mercurial world of fashion, it's comforting to know that some things will never change—Anna Wintour's hairdo, an Olsen in the front row, and a tsunami
of earnest media coverage on how a conspiracy of evil designers and
foolish models are reducing women to jutting-collarboned wrecks, barely
able to lift their heads from the lavatory bowl to make it to Barneys
in time for the pre-collections.

Click the Image to View Our Gallery of Skinny Models

HP Main - Hilton Skinny Models 2

Getty Images (2); AP Photo


Let's be clear. Anorexia and bulimia are horrific psychological conditions, destroying lives and families, and carrying devastating long-term health risks even when not fatal. Sufferers deserve nothing
but respect and support for their condition. But is that condition
nearly so prevalent as the barrage of attention it regularly attracts
actually deserves? And are women really so pathologically stupid that
they are unable to distinguish the fantasy of the runway from the
realities of their own bodies? Arguably, the "size zero" debate is
merely another side of the infantilized, hysterical box women thought
they had clawed their way out of a century ago, an insidious means of
suggesting that though we can run companies and governments we're still
not quite rational creatures, too dainty and delicate to cope with the
dissonances between the Bambi-limbed aspirations of the catwalk and our
own wretched, cellulite-smothered carcasses.

That women can be beautiful at any size, age, or color is something no serious person would dispute. But the fashion industry is ultimately unconcerned with beauty, its objective is selling clothes, and the
consensus remains that in order to achieve this, models need to be
thin. Whether or not this is aesthetically desirable is a matter of
taste, not morality. The recent success of "bigger' girls such as Lara
Stone or Daisy Lowe suggests that it does not always obtain, as V
magazine's recent billboard campaign emphasizes. Even Karl Lagerfeld
has jumped onboard the biscuits and gravy train with his latest shoot
of Miss Dirty Martini. The fact remains that for girls chasing the big
money, skinniness is professionally necessary.


I spoke to one ex-model, Sasha*, who in her heyday walked for Tom
Ford and Galliano; "Sure, we had to be skinny. I lived on Diet Coke and
apples for two years. For the couture, we had to get up at 4 a.m. to be
sewn into the clothes and there was huge pressure to be thin. But I
made a million dollars by the time I was 20, I bought a town house in
Manhattan and put myself through Columbia. Does that make me a victim?"
For every Sasha, there are a hundred hungry wannabes who fall by the
wayside, but why are we so keen to dismiss the professionalism and
discipline of models who are prepared to make sacrifices to reach the
top? Is it a coincidence that modeling is the one profession outside
the porn industry where women consistently out-earn their male
counterparts? Are we just a bit angry that young women with no
qualifications other than what nature gave them get to be so powerful?

We rarely get hysterical about the weight qualifications required of male sportsmen. Jockeys, boxers, and wrestlers put themselves through torture to make weight. A survey published by the U.S. National Library
of Medicine lists a range of weight-loss methods for jockeys that would
make any model agency proud—69 percent skip meals, 34 percent use
diuretics, 67 percent sweat off the pounds in the sauna, 30 percent
regularly vomit and 40 percent use laxatives. So where are the angry
headlines and government initiatives to fatten up our jockeys? Perhaps
in sport, the sacrifices are viewed as noble, and the rewards (prize
money or prestigious college scholarships) seen as secondary to the
noble end of winning for its own sake. Shifting dresses is after all a
frivolous little multibillion dollar industry. Or is it that men are
considered psychologically robust enough to admire the buff beauties of
GQ or Men's Health without getting their tighty-whities in a twist?
Women, it is implied, are too fragile to make a distinction between the
Victoria's Secret catalogue and their own closets. Young women who
choose to conform to the demands of their industry in order to maximize
their earnings are portrayed as irrational and deluded, while young men
who make comparable choices are admired.

Eating disorders, we are told, are on the rise, ready to grab the gut of any vulnerable teenager who spends too much time dreaming over Vogue. Except, actually, they're not.

The South Carolina Department of Mental Health claims that one in 200 American women suffer from anorexia, as opposed to the American Heart Association's statistic of 39.4 million women suffering from
obesity. So that's half a percent against 34 percent. EMJA, the medical
journal of Australia, concurs with the 0.5 percent statistic, noting
that anorexia nervosa is not common and adding, "Eating
disorders have captured the public imagination… This publicity tends to
obscure the continuing puzzle created by these…conditions." (Gilchrist
et al., 1998) Clinical Knowledge Summaries 2009, the statistics
department of the British National Institute of Health and Clinical
Excellence, says that 19 out of one million women are diagnosed as
anorexic, as opposed to 240,000 per million for obesity. The British
NHS survey of Disordered Eating noted 620 hospital treatments for
anorexia or bulimia (with some patients registered twice or more) for
2005 to 2006 as opposed to 17,458 for the same period for obesity.

There is simply no argument to be had as to the most prevalent weight-related threat to young women's health, and yet still every year someone vilifies poor old Kate Moss for suggesting that nothing tastes
as good as skinny feels. Well, right on, Kate. The hoary old trope that
models are statistically thinner than the average woman now as opposed
to 20 years ago proves nothing more than that the average woman got
heavier.


Women have always gone to absurd and often dangerous extremes in pursuit of the beauty myth. Fourteen-inch waists and mercury-eaten complexions for the Elizabethans, pthisis- inducing sponged muslin for
Romantic groupies. One of the many rather creepy truisms trotted out in
support of "real' models is that much fashion is produced by men who
would prefer us to resemble adolescent boys. Yeah, we get that.
Fashion is about fantasy, about impossibility, about, dare we say it,
art. Most women can tell the difference. The suffragettes got us the
vote and they did it in whalebone corsets. Stop the presses, how we
look is not actually who we are.

Women recovering from severe eating disorders consistently report that their illness was not induced by the desire to look like Gisele, but by far more complex psychological issues. Is it not demeaning to
insist that such women were gripped by nothing more than vanity?
Feminism has created a world in which young women are safe and secure
enough to do a lot of stupid things as part of a rite of passage—they
can drink Jell-O shots and worship Robert Pattinson and grow up to
become accountants or lawyers or CEOs. Laying off the Krispy Kremes for
a few years in order to shimmy into Paige jeans is hardly on a par with
being unable to menstruate, but the rhetoric of the eating-disorder
lobby insultingly blurs the difference between harmless faddiness and
genuine disease.

Thin is a feminist issue because it grabs the headlines from more serious causes with which committed feminists might concern themselves. As the late great George Carlin put it, "What kind of goddamn disease
is this anyway? "I don't wanna eat!", "Well, go fuck yourself." If we
want to worry about malnutrition, why don't we get exercised about the
hundreds of thousands of women who starve slowly around the world? Thin
is a feminist issue because the well-meant anxiety over eating
disorders makes us look dim. It's patronizing and disempowering and
reduces legitimate concerns over body issues to juvenile whining. We
could just leave the models to get on with their job. Maybe the radical
way to look at this season's shows would be to enjoy the spectacle, buy
the frock and get on with something more interesting? Obviously, we're
not all brainless enough to starve ourselves out of existence because a
sinister conglomerate of designers and editors says we should. Sadly,
the current correlation between fashion and anorexia suggests precisely
that.

* not her real name








I think this article brings up a lot of good points, personally.

Separating eating disorders from being naturally skinny is just as important as separating runway models from real life people.


I personally do not find fashion models attractive in the least. Give me a choice between Sports Illustrated girls and Calvin Klein, and guess who I'm going to aspire to look like?

The chick with boobs. That's who.


I can't honestly think of a single friend or co-worker...any female adult that I know in real life that wants to look like Cruella D'Ville from 101 Dalmatians. Sure, a lot of women want to drop a few pounds, but they also want a nice ass and chest.

When you model clothing, those are the first things you've got to give up. Those with a coltish body type don't have em to begin with. I know. I've been friends with girls that didn't weigh a hundred pounds, and ate twice what I did. (I'm a curvy girl.)


Why don't we just understand as people and as a society that fashion models are not beautiful. They are simply a body type that makes clothing look good to investors. No more,  no less.



Feel free to go to town, folks. I know it's controversial. Just remember to keep it civil!




((sorry about the bad c&p last time. I fixed it for reading ease.))

Views: 163

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

. It's like people who tell you not to donate money to an animal shelter, because there are people starving in the world.

I really like that. Good line. I really like what you are saying here, even if I don't agree with the over all idea.
What I got from the article isn't just a numbers game of "fat kills more than skinny, so skinny is better." but instead a larger picture of the idea that skinny can be healthy, much the same way that people claim big can be healthy. It also pointed out that most women think that beauty is found in all spectrum of sizes, but that the fashion industry uses a formula that's proven to work
-skinny chicks.
Why it works, I have no idea. I don't even think market researchers know..
But I totally agree. Bodies you see on the runway have about as much in common with the average woman as runway clothes has in common with work wear. Everything is so EXTREME in fashion shows.. the styles, the weight, the looks, the hair...that it has no basis in reality, anyway.

"I have no idea if this disease exists in cultures that do not use skinny models for their fashion shows. Probably not."
Anorexia and it's sub-issues are found in every culture.. even those that like 'bigger is better' in their women. It is a nervous disorder that is a combination of neurological issues. One of the issues is that the brain of an anorexic doesn't respond as pleasurably to food as that of a non-anorexic brain, it doesn't register cues of dangers vs. rewards, and it exaggerates concern or worry for the future.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/07/050708055534.htm
"Women recovering from severe eating disorders consistently report that their illness was not induced by the desire to look like Gisele, but by far more complex psychological issues."
Which is totally backed up. People don't starve themselves to death because they want to be pretty. Not too many folks are that vain.
People starve themselves to death because there is something screwed up with their wiring. Science is making gains in finding out and hopefully correcting just what that is.
If women were becoming anorexic because society tells them to be skinny, then why is obesity on the rise, instead of of it being on the decline. Surely with modern technology we are more bombarded by imagery of what we are 'supposed' to look like.
Anorexia is far different than someone being inspired (or guilt tripped) into loosing a few pounds. I think that distinction needs to be clearly made.
I like the fact that the article spoke out about it, even though eating disorders have some sort of sacred, taboo status in the American culture.
We can't really solve a problem until we understand it... and to understand it we have to examine it without fear or caution.
If you've ever read anything written by someone who's actually suffering from (and I do mean suffering from) an eating disorder - whether it's anorexia, bulemia, or some form of overeating that leads to extremes of obesity, it's really quite terrifying and sad.

It rarely involves a desire to be pretty and usually stems from some complicated psychological issues, and often from issues stemming from a lack of control in some aspect of the sufferer's life. Also, it involves a serious amount of self-loathing to depths that are pretty tragic. I agree with Misty - people starve themselves to death or eat themselves to death because something is seriously wrong in their brains. It's the same reason that people do anything to themselves to death - something just isn't right.

Reading that article was kind of refreshing in the way that the articles about "What's wrong with fat?' have been refreshing.

The world of couture is its own monster with its own standards of what passes as appealing. Hell, even fat designers don't make their own lines for plus size - the Rodarte for Target line that was released in January is a prime example of that!
It is strange how it's never really talked about. At least from this angle. I guess we still have some taboos to break.
Ok here goes. Firstly, it is cheaper for designers to make smaller clothes so think maybe some of this stems from the sample clothes being small ... or at least the origins.

Secondly, if ppl aren't influenced by advertising they wouldn't do it ... so the truth is that women AND mean ARE 'so fragile as to be influenced'

Thirdly, many designers are homosexual men ... whereas most heterosexual men actually DO prefer plumper ladies - this may be a factor.

Fourthly - yes you're right - fancynancy has a big bum ('ass' to you US folks) ... skinny is NOT the word so I might be a teensy weensy bit biased ...

Fifthly - well make up your own reason but the stuff on runways is just bizarre and nothing to do with those designers' REAL clothes they do for 'normal' women with BIG money

Sixthly - I'm getting bored with this topic and BORED with SKINNY MODELS - More variety please, just ONE Beth Ditto or an 'older lady' ...

Seventhly - lucky Nr7? Umm let's see ... there is a vast difference between healthy and obese. We come in all shapes and sizes, some cultures like a big woman ... The West doesn;t seem to ... when is those times gonna achange???
"Secondly, if ppl aren't influenced by advertising they wouldn't do it ... so the truth is that women AND mean ARE 'so fragile as to be influenced'"

I think people are influenced to the extent of 'so this is what society wants me to look like?'

That extent falls short of 'I'm going to eat so little that I cause irreversible organ failure.'

I mean, evolution has designed a body with urges. These urges are created by chemicals in the brain. They make us want to mate (even if we don't want offspring) and stay alive (even if we hate our shitty jobs, ect.) When something short circuits those urges in a way that we ignore our bodies basic needs for a drawn out period of time, as opposed one quick act of violence for suicide...it means that something, somewhere isn't quite right.

People that literally drink themselves to death are another example. I can think of one man off the top of my head. He had a life so many people would envy. He had a support network. He had EVERYTHING (as viewed from the outside) but one day he just couldn't put down the bottle. And then the same thing happened the day after that and after that and after that.
The guy was hospitalized because he drank so much that the alcohol ate through his esophagus and caused a bleed. The doctors told him if he drank anything...even once more.. he would be dead. One the way home, the guy stopped at a drive through liquor store. They found his body the next day. When you survive choking on your own blood once, but immediately return back to the same behavior that you KNOW will end in a painful, gruesome death...that goes beyond being influenced by a Jack Daniels commercial on T.V.
Same thing for and eating disorder.
When your body isn't getting proper nutrients, your skin and hair suffer.
Most people don't view a scabby, bald person as attractive, yet that is one of the results of anorexia/bulimia. This leads me to believe that it isn't about beauty, because it sure as hell ain't beautiful.

"We come in all shapes and sizes, some cultures like a big woman ... The West doesn;t seem to ... when is those times gonna achange???"

Society views beauty as what is rare. When there wasn't enough food to go around, skinny was ugly and big was beautiful.
Now that most people are big, it's skinny that's desired.
I'm pretty sure it has something to do with genetic distribution. We want the exotic because it will diversify our genes and theoretically make our offspring healthier.
In a globalized, multicultural world, it's hard to say when and what will be considered attractive. That's why everyone is always looking for the Next Big Thing.
Well I suppose we might agree to disagree ... advertisers would not spend so much money unless it worked, many scientific tests have determined that ppl ARE affected by what that stuff, and of course dieting is big business too.

'Society' can't be taken for granted ... the workings of capitalism have a bearing too. If you're skinny, fine - as long as you're healthy ... me, I'm plumptious and beautiful ... well I'm entitled to my view too. Also interesting that there is much more anorexia and bulimia in men now with beauty products directed to them too; also that white girls are much more dissatisfied with their looks than boys or black or asian people - according to a recent uk study - I would suggest because less advertising directed towards latter ;)
"Well I suppose we might agree to disagree ... advertisers would not spend so much money unless it worked,"
Wait.. are you saying that advertisers are working towards making people have eating disorders? I'm not sure I understand. I agreed that marketing works towards purchasing power, but I don't think that advertising creates eating disorders, or that it's the intent of ads to give people eating disorders. Yes, I do understand and agree that a constant stream of skinny-chick-imaging is responsible for diet pills, face creams and exercise equipment, but based on current evidence, I do not think that a psychological issue with neurological symptoms can be contracted by watching T.V.

"Also interesting that there is much more anorexia and bulimia in men now with beauty products directed to them too; also that white girls are much more dissatisfied with their looks than boys or black or asian people - according to a recent uk study - I would suggest because less advertising directed towards latter ;)"

Do you have a link to these studies, by any chance? I'd be interested in seeing them.
Hmm.. I could agree with that.
Of course, watching TV will not cause you to have anorexia nervosa or bulimia, but if you have a predisposition, being bombarded with constant images that only thin is beautiful, can affect a person who already has image problems.
But I don't see it being any larger of a risk factor than say...actually being Caucasian.. I see it as less of one than having overly concerned parents/lovers who constantly send a message that you'll only be loved if you are skinny.
Just a correction ... on my previous post i missed out the important word NOT

ie NOT just ONE Beth Ditto or ONE older lady .... more variety please is what i meant not just a token novelty ...

Plus an addition .... recently Alexander McQueen was found dead - a 40 year old gay man and an 'important' designer of high profile couture clothes, especially for rich women ... they say suicide, I say wouldn't be surprised if drugs involved. Cocaine and such are 'good' for skinniness ... that as ALSO a factor ... and rife in model circles ...

Sorry skinnies, you're NOT gonna have it all your way ....

The times they are achanging or the answer's blowin in the wind????

Hope I'm not blowin too much hot air here, peace n love whatever your size!!!
I agree that I'd love to see more variety on T.V.
I'd also like to clear up a few things.
I'm not 'skinny' by fashion standards. If I were to model for clothing right now, I'd be laughed out of the studio. I'm currently 5'6 125 lbs with measurements of 36-23-34. That would make me a plus sized model. In normal clothing, I wear a size four, six or eight, depending on the designer or desired fit. That isn't plus sized in the real world. I'm happy with my size. I feel healthy (except for this stupid cold!) and I love my curves. When I was scrambling to fit into a wedding dress, I seriously reconsidered when I started to loose my chest. The ass can go (to some extent) but I like my D cups. That is only a change of ten pounds.
When I actually was modeling at age 19, I was VERY underweight. I weighed 109 lbs and it looked horrible. The funny thing is, we were never told that we were supposed to look pretty, or that skinny was pretty. We were told that we were supposed to conform to a specific standard because it was our job, and it was what we were getting paid to do. There was no idea that modeling was beautiful. The clothes were supposed to be beautiful, but we were not. After all, that would distract attention from the clothes, right?
I guess that is why I can't understand how anyone can look at the pages of a magazine and go "I want to look like that!"
The reality of it is... you don't.
There are some models that I drool over. Victoria Secret ladies are pretty nice to look at. But again, once you realize that they are wearing 10+ layers of make up just on their butts to give them the look of the correct shadowing and shape, it does sorta of break the illusion....almost. When you know it isn't real, it's a lot less fun.
You don't hear about woman getting a negative self image because of CG and video games, do you? Those artistic creations have about as much in common with the real woman as models do. Lighting, airbrushing computer 'touch ups' are standard on any photo shoot. The end result looks NOTHING like the model did when she walked in.

I agree with Nancy that bulimia and drugs are utilized as a tool to stay skinny for bodies that are not naturally meant to be that way. They are also used for professional athletes, both male and female. With advances in new hunger suppressant drugs, people are giving up coke and vomiting because of the side effects. No one wants to hire a model with her teeth eroded from bile. Or how about a caved in nose from too much blow? Nope. Modern medicine is seeing these techniques fall to the wayside. Bulimia is quickly falling out of favor and once again rightfully regarded as a disease instead of a tool. Coke is back to being a party drug instead of a work crutch.

Sorry skinnies, you're NOT gonna have it all your way ....
rings of the same biased that the article is talking about. Why is it ok to say something like that, but not ok to say :
"Sorry fatties. You're NOT going to have it all your way."
I see morbid obesity and severe anorexia/bulimia as two sides of the same coin. You can either eat until you are too large to move, or not eat until you are too weak to move. Both come from some serious issues. It's only the obese that has linguistic protection, though. Why is that? It's still fine to say things like 'skinny-little-bitch' and it's half compliment. But if you hear anyone insult an overweight person, they are portrayed as monsters.
I don't know. I mean, is it from the idea that since skinny is prettier, it's ok to insult them? Not everyone thinks that skinner is prettier.
I think most adults really believe that HEALTHY is pretty.
Maybe I'm totally off and misread that line, or read too much into it..
Reverting back to the theme of fashion week, I think it is impossible to seperate catwalk models from 'real women', whether it be high fashion or highstreet fashion it's related. It's not a question of intelligence it's a question of fact, most of highstreet fashion comes from concepts presented on the catwalk and if you look at brands such as American Apparel the clothes are in fact made for breastless bumless adolescent boys where a size 10/12 (british sizing) is a Large/XLarge. I'm not saying this is the cause of anorexia, bulimia or obesity, however it does give media and fashion some power over the concept of what constitutes a "large". Why is it acceptable that the majority of women wouldn't mind loosing a few pounds? This sort of discontent is just as worrying.

'Is it a coincidence that modeling is the one profession outside the porn industry where women consistently out-earn their male counterparts? Are we just a bit angry that young women with no qualifications other than what nature gave them get to be so powerful?'

And how exactly do you measure power? I resent the fact that the only women that earn more than their partners acheive this by selling what is traditionally and sadly commonly thought of as a woman's best asset; her body. Also, just because a woman earns a lot of money it does not make her powerful.

'As the late great George Carlin put it, "What kind of goddamn disease is this anyway? "I don't wanna eat!", "Well, go fuck yourself."'

Including this above quote and describing anorexia as "something scewed up in the brain", really contradicts everything you said in your first paragraph, and shows your true feelings about such a serious disease. Your understanding is very limited, and your views of what constitutes a feminist are quite frankly embarrassing.
Including this above quote and describing anorexia as "something scewed up in the brain", really contradicts everything you said in your first paragraph, and shows your true feelings about such a serious disease. Your understanding is very limited, and your views of what constitutes a feminist are quite frankly embarrassing.
Was that directed to the author of the article or me?

And how exactly do you measure power? I resent the fact that the only women that earn more than their partners acheive this by selling what is traditionally and sadly commonly thought of as a woman's best asset; her body. Also, just because a woman earns a lot of money it does not make her powerful.
I dunno. Why is it that professional athletes (who are in fact selling nothing more than their bodies.) Make an obscene amount more than teacher or farmers or you know... those folks necessary for the survival and progression of our species? I personally think it is ass backwards, but my opinion only counts for so much. The fact of the matter is, society perceives power as influence....and influence usually walks hand in hand with beauty and money.
Why is it acceptable that the majority of women wouldn't mind loosing a few pounds?
Well, it really depends on if that majority of women would be healthier ten pounds lighter. If the answer is yes, then the acceptability isn't always a bad thing, maybe. Desire, envy, inspiration...call it what you will, but if it saves one woman from having a heart attack or type two diabetes, then motivation coming from such sources isn't inherently evil.
I'm not saying this is the cause of anorexia, bulimia or obesity, however it does give media and fashion some power over the concept of what constitutes a "large" Right... so if we've established that the 'thin' imagery doesn't cause eating disorders, but might motivate a woman to drop ten pounds...you've also pointed out that there is an influence of what is considered 'large.'
My mind isn't made up on that. Yes, some designers market specific body types. How is that a bad thing? You realize flat-butted, no-boobed girls need clothes, too? One of my best friends is super skinny because that's how nature made her. She eats normally and has a healthy lifestyle. That's just how her body is. Why shouldn't she be able to pick from a variety of clothing designers? If you don't like the way one line fits you, then purchase from another one. I'm too curvy for American Apparel, but I'm not resentful for it. I look damn great in Baby Phat, and she doesn't. She can't even wear it.
I think that we need to push that HEALTHY is sexy. Not a single shape or size....
Historically human kind has been the most attracted to that which is rarest. Back when food was more scarce, the image of beauty was large. That was the image of health. Now that people are dying from weight-related problems, the idea of beautiful is skinny. We like what is least common. I'm looking at this from an anthropological point of view. This is what we'd determine if a more advanced society uncovered a city and studied our billboards and magazines.
Personally? Well, every person I've talked to loves their women in all different shapes and sizes. My above mentioned friend has been unable to attract a guy she quite liked because he wasn't physically into her.
I lived in Thailand for a few years and knew men that just weren't into the Thai physique.
My current room mate only likes bigger girls, because anything else looks like "all elbows, knees and clavicles" to him. By bigger I mean he only likes anything above a size 14 (U.S)
I see a huge variety in desire in the American meat market. Maybe there isn't much in the catwalk market...but that's their loss.

RSS

Support T|A

Think Atheist is 100% member supported

All proceeds go to keeping Think Atheist online.

Donate with Dogecoin

Forum

Are homophobes really phobic?

Started by Unseen in Society. Last reply by Obfuskation 1 minute ago. 20 Replies

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Services we love

We are in love with our Amazon

Book Store!

Gadget Nerd? Check out Giz Gad!

Into life hacks? Check out LabMinions.com

Advertise with ThinkAtheist.com

© 2014   Created by Dan.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service