What to do with guilty Jodi Arias and other psychopaths

Yesterday (May 8, 2013), Jodi Arias was found guilty of murdering her boyfriend. Actually, she more than murdered him, she virtually obliterated him. Stabbing him 29 times, shooting him in the face, and slitting his throat almost from ear to ear. She made damned fucking sure he was dead.

That alone should qualify her as a psychopath. However, she's also a pathological liar. She had several versions of her story, finally admitting that she killed him but in, as she termed it, "self defense." She trotted in battered woman syndrome, post traumatic stress disorder, and just about everything but the kitchen sink in an effort to beat the rap.

She may get the death penalty, but should she? The syllable "path" in "psychopath" and "pathological liar" indicates a sickness. She's not a mentally healthy person. 

pathology (n.) "science of diseases," 1610s, from French pathologie (16c.), from medical Latin pathologia "study of disease," from Greek pathos "suffering" (source)

As revolting as the murder was, can we separate her guilt from the sickness from which she suffers?

More generally, suppose all crimes could be traced back to some sort of pathology. What would happen to the entire concept of guilt? And suppose that once a pathology was identified, there was a "cure." Could we ethically hold people responsible for their actions before the cure, given their diminished capacity for making proper ethical choices?

Tags: Arias, Jodi, liar, pathological, psychopath

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Society as a whole has a bigger 'dog in the fight' than individual victims where the entire justice system is concerned. When it comes to individual court cases, the reverse may be true, but the justice system itself is larger than those individual cases.

I would submit that the justice system exists primarily to preserve order.

I don't agree to disagree to someone who walks off calling 'bullshit'. You have clearly stated you disagree, but have yet provide any argument to the contrary.

Okay then. Thought there was already a debate floating around about this somewhere...
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/11/13/is-neuroscience-the...
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=how-free-will-coll...

It's irrelevant what factors play into someone's decision to kill a person outside of self-defense. When it comes down to the do-or-die moment, they could have simply not done it. It's not hard - you don't have to even do anything! If you feel like that's not a good enough argument for you, then ... okay? Considering saying there's no such thing as free will isn't completely correct even from a scientific standpoint, I'm already over it.

Punishment causes two-fold harm. First, it harms the person being punished...

LOL I'll have to try that line of reasoning the next time I get pulled over for speeding. 

Second, it costs resources, which typically means tax-payer money.

Concerning capital punishment, from what I've seen it costs about the same to house someone for life as it does to lethally inject them - and it only costs that much because of all the appeals they use.

If both punishing criminals and reducing harm are considered gains, these two things can conflict.

They're only in conflict if you see punishing criminals as a bad thing. And I don't.

Having read them start to finish, neither of your links contradicts what I have said.

@Kris 

Society as a whole has a bigger 'dog in the fight' than individual victims where the entire justice system is concerned. When it comes to individual court cases, the reverse may be true, but the justice system itself is larger than those individual cases.

I would submit that the justice system exists primarily to preserve order.

Well, to preserve order by replacing revenge with process intended to be fair to the accused, I suppose, but the interests of society at large aren't well served if the victims of assault or murder are simply given the role of witnesses to the harm done and then sent home to appreciate the fairness of the process to the accused. 

How can order be preserved without the ability to provide satisfying results, especially in the eyes of the aggrieved? And have no doubt, the rest of society watches the procedure to see how the interests of the aggrieved are satisfied.

This is why purely abstract procedural justice falls on its face if it cannot satisfy the aggrieved as well as possible. It is simply unsatisfactory and as so cannot expect the respect and regard of the populace.

@Unseen I think I agree with you there.

Jodie was a crazy child. Born sociopath and dangerous. These people can never be cured, they are missing their humanity. The good Mormons want her put to death and who could blame them. I don't know how I would feel.

Especially in the penalty phase, her behavior was bizarre. She is a psychopath, I believe, and a pathology is by definition a sickness. She should be put away where she can't ever harm anyone ever again but not executed. I do believe in the death penalty, but not for sick people.

I think I'm with Stephy on this. Sometimes I think just take these people out of the gene pool, and other times I have real problems in the notion of the state having the power to take human life.
...with the notion. Sorry

Being mentally sick is no excuse for committing murder.

She knew exactly the crime in her actions and she still went with it the moment she stabbed him. She deserves the death penalty

you must be confused. Justice =/= religious way

Justice is a concept based on rationality and logical reasoning.

Straw man argument

Come back to me when you are not in violation of it and have an actual valid point.

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