While this whole rapture thing was admittedly hilarious for we non-believers (and most Christians alike), it serves to highlight an important point about what a colossal waste of resources humanity's obsession with superstition and mythology are.

 

It also highlights how absurd and outdated the practice of affording tax-exempt status to religious organizations is. Camping's organization reported $18.3M of donations in 2009 and had assets of more than $104M. Tax free.

 

The cherry on top of the sad reality that untold billions are spent on the spread of ignorance (as opposed to technological and medical advancements to, you know, actually improve the lives of conscious creatures) is the fact that people like you and I donate money to organizations specifically designed to keep the ignorant out of our affairs; ie we have to keep fighting for church and state separation.

 

I'm passionate about maintaining the wall between church and state, but I wish its upkeep weren't so expensive. Those are dollars that would be much better spent funding cancer research or making the widespread use of clean energy a reality.

 

Do you think going after the tax exemption is a fight worth fighting?

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_apocalypse_saturday

 

 

Tags: and, church, exemption, state, tax

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Yeah, definitely. Religion is a waste of money, time & human potential.

I think religion & other such loony businesses(yes I believe that religion is a business - one of the 3 biggest in the world - prostitution & education being the other two) like astrology, fortune telling, speaking to the dead business & other businesses of the same type should also be hit with an extra tax - for destroying the brain cells of the people who believe in it.

While I don't disagree that there are worthwhile social programs affiliated with churches/temples/etc, the same argument could be made for oil companies, pharmaceutical companies, Google or any large corporation. They all have philanthropic arms.


This is good, don't get me wrong, and activities associated directly with the philanthropy should received some type of tax advantage, but that's it.

 

Furthermore, if such social services (education, healthcare) contain a proselytizing component, that should void the exemption.

something needs to be done

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