Time for some grammar nazi fun. Things people say that bother you.

Give pet peeves and discuss.

"I'll take who's next."

If that sounds right to you, you have a tin ear. It should be "I'll take whoever is next" or "I'm ready for the next person."

Checkout signs that say something like "Ten items or less."

No, no, no. It's "fewer," not "less."

Here's a biblical one:

"The wages of sin is death." What the hell? Plural noun and singular verb?

It should be "The wage of sin is death" because "The wages of sin are death" is just as messed up as the original and for the same reason. 

Your turn.

Views: 1460

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Verbal grammatical errors I either don't pick up on, or they don't bother me. Misplaced or missing apostrophes, improper uses of you're, your, their, they're etc. really make me think less of a person. Almost as much as if they say they believe in god. :)

"I seen that." That one really bugs me.

those ones

idears instead of ideas

The word "artisan" is old, but I think the word "artisanal" has cropped up in yuppiedom in the last 10 years or so and it's so pompous it makes me laugh. 

Hey, it's just cheese or beer. Cheesemaking and beer brewing are crafts, not arts. And the people who make them are craftspeople, not artistes or artisans.

But Unseen, it's artis-anal cheese or beer.... double the pricetag :P

Also from wikitionary, definition of Artisan:

A skilled manual worker who uses tools and machinery in a particular craft.

I looked up wikitionary at dictionary.com, and apparently there is no such word.

The wikitionary definition is all well and good, but I'm talking about the highbrow way it's being used and the overtones people unaware of wikitionary definitions read into the word.

I looked up wikitionary at dictionary.com, and apparently there is no such word.

Blatant censorship of a competitor, I assure you :P

Are you saying people think "artisan" means something other than "highly skilled craftsman", or in this context: "crafts produced with high skill"? Maybe you could put forward your own "highbrow" definition?

To quote myself:

Hey, it's just cheese or beer. Cheesemaking and beer brewing are crafts, not arts. And the people who make them are craftspeople, not artistes or artisans.

You seem to think we're disagreeing about something.

You're saying all cheese is "just cheese", leaving no room for recognition of the skill of the cheese maker. I'm saying the skill of the cheese maker is indeed a factor... meaning the existance of artisanal cheese is indeed justified as it is cheese made by an artisan in the craft of cheese making.

Later you seemed to insinuate that "artisan" meant something other than the definition I put forth.

Are these not disagreements?

Cheese has been made for centuries, and in fact so-called artisanal cheese just follows age old recipes for the most part. It's very formulaic and not calling for much in the way of creativity.

Words have meanings in dictionaries and in actual use. I maintain that people read more into "artisanal" than is present in the dictionary definition. For many people it has overtones of luxury and specialness when a cheese is called "artisanal," even though it's just a blue cheese or a swiss-style or whatever.

Do you here hear "idears" when some British speak? I often hear an r when the don't mean it to exist, e.g. the word "law" sounds to me like "lawr". And then strangely, the r sound seems missing in words, e.g. "war" sounds to me like wo-ah.

(Yes, I did actually mistype hear as here, above.)

It's a common New England thing to introduce an "r" into a soft "a." Cuber for Cuba, for example. Contrariwise, they will often drop the "r" of the end of some words. "Watuh" for "water," "buttuh" for "butter," etc.

RSS

© 2020   Created by Rebel.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service