The value of anything is established by its properties.  If values aren't really arbitrary, then there is an absolute morality.  The rest of this is trying to explain why values can't be arbitrary, they can only be misunderstood as arbitrary.  

This thread is an argument that order is the basis of all concepts.  Order is very rigid, so when you build a concept like a moral system on it, like all concepts should be built, it is going to lead to absolute results. Morality is based on values, and the only way to justify morality is to prove your values are accurate.  My argument is that values aren't arbitrary, thus there is an absolute morality.

Original post below:

Many atheists shy away from absolute morality because it sounds religious.  I argue that there has to be an absolute morality because the universe is absolute.  This may seem wrong as there are many subjective things.  I am contending that this isn't true because subjectivity resides on the conceptual level and like disorder and change is not a part of actual existence, but rather merely descriptive.  Absolute morality has to exist because the base foundation for morality is order, which enables it to have structure as a social concept.  This means that even as a concept, it has to have an absolute and most perfect form as a social concept.  

I have been working on this for a while, and I think I am nearing completion, but I am wondering what faults may be found with this line of thought...  I have had to return to the drawing board to correct my errors a few times already.

This below is an addendum:

What I am contending is that once morality is conceived as a concept, the nature of order upon which any concept is structured necessitates a most perfect form.

Individual perception causes humans to see the concept with innaccuracy in contrast to the order with which the concept maintains structure in conceptual reality.  This creates subjectivity.

But where I am really going with this is that order is the base functional principle of any structure in the universe.  

At the very foundation of the level of actuality lies order. Without order, molecules neither form nor bind. Order enables structure, which in turn enables every other level of existence. Order permeates every level of existence as its foundation, including anything that exists on the conceptual level. For this reason, structural order serves as the archetypal basis that justifies having a moral system.

Disorder is mistaken as coexisting with order, but it exists on the conceptual level only and is a name given to an observation of change. It is not a counterpart to order.  That means disorder is not actual.  It is conceptual.

These things tie together to start to point out that best action can be established on the basis of the order of the universe, and the lack of actuality of disorder which would be its only challenger.

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Unseen, that isn't how adhering to an archetype works.  The Spartans practiced a type of the archetype morality.  It like most other types of morality has its accuracies and it has its flaws.

Is your theory purely theoretical, or does it prescribe and proscribe behaviors in such a way that those prescriptions and proscriptions are factual in nature?

I believe it elevates logic to being a necessary virtue for us. 

The idea is that if disorder has no actual value, it makes no sense to give it precedence over order.  Order has ultimate value.   Logic is the means through which we ensure one thought is actually properly connected to another.

Having things be perfect is an overzealous ideal.  But what this does is change the way we think about things.  Because once you understand how the system works, you can understand how to operate with it better.

John - just want to give you something to work with:


Dictionary    
absolute |ˈabsəˌloōt; ˌabsəˈloōt|
adjective
1 not qualified or diminished in any way; total : absolute secrecy | absolute silence | the attention he gave you was absolute.
• used for general emphasis when expressing an opinion : the policy is absolute folly.
• (of powers or rights) not subject to any limitation; unconditional : no one dared challenge her absolute authority | human right to life is absolute.
• (of a ruler) having unrestricted power : he proclaimed himself absolute monarch.
• Law (of a decree) final : the decree of nullity was made absolute.
• Law see absolute title .
2 viewed or existing independently and not in relation to other things; not relative or comparative : absolute moral standards.
• Grammar (of a construction) syntactically independent of the rest of the sentence, as in dinner being over, we left the table.
• Grammar (of a transitive verb) used without an expressed object (e.g., guns kill).
• Grammar (of an adjective) used without an expressed noun (e.g., the brave).
noun Philosophy
a value or principle that is regarded as universally valid or that may be viewed without relation to other things : good and evil are presented as absolutes.
• ( the absolute) Philosophy that which exists without being dependent on anything else.
• ( the absolute) Theology ultimate reality; God.
DERIVATIVES
absoluteness noun
ORIGIN late Middle English : from Latin absolutus ‘freed, unrestricted,’ past participle of absolvere (see absolve ).

Thesaurus    
absolute
adjective
1 absolute silence | an absolute disgrace complete, total, utter, out-and-out, outright, entire, perfect, pure, decided; thorough, thoroughgoing, undivided, unqualified, unadulterated, unalloyed, unmodified, unreserved, downright, undiluted, consummate, unmitigated, sheer, arrant, rank, dyed-in-the-wool. antonym partial, qualified.
2 the absolute truth definite, certain, positive, unconditional, categorical, unquestionable, incontrovertible, undoubted, unequivocal, decisive, conclusive, confirmed, infallible. antonym partial, qualified.
3 absolute power unlimited, unrestricted, unrestrained, unbounded, boundless, infinite, ultimate, total, supreme, unconditional. antonym limited, conditional.
4 an absolute monarch autocratic, despotic, dictatorial, tyrannical, tyrannous, absolutist, authoritarian, arbitrary, autonomous, sovereign, autarchic, autarchical, omnipotent. antonym constitutional.
5 absolute moral standards universal, fixed, independent, nonrelative, nonvariable, absolutist. antonym relative, flexible.

This is really interesting. Are you saying that morality is absolute but it is an individual's perception of it that accounts for our concept of moral subjectivity? This is something I have thought about before.

If morality is just the product of the order of the universe, it cannot be any other way. Does your idea mean that you see the universe as deterministic? If so, what do you actually mean by 'morality'

Sort of.  What I am contending is that once morality is conceived as a concept, the nature of order upon which any concept is structured necessitates a most perfect form.

Individual perception causes humans to see the concept with innaccuracy in contrast to the order with which the concept maintains structure in conceptual reality.  This creates subjectivity.

But where I am really going with this is that order is the base functional principle of any structure in the universe.  

At the very foundation of the level of actuality lies order. Without order, molecules neither form nor bind. Order enables structure, which in turn enables every other level of existence. Order permeates every level of existence as its foundation, including anything that exists on the conceptual level. For this reason, structural order serves as the archetypal basis that justifies having a moral system.

Disorder is mistaken as coexisting with order, but it exists on the conceptual level only and is a name given to an observation of change. It is not a counterpart to order.  That means disorder is not actual.  It is conceptual.

These things tie together to start to point out that best action can be established on the basis of the order of the universe, and the lack of actuality of disorder which would be its only challenger.

Come look at my teenage son's bedroom and tell me disorder is conceptual, not actual. (ba-dum-bum)

This is really interesting. Are you saying that morality is absolute but it is an individual's perception of it that accounts for our concept of moral subjectivity?

If that's true, then it's almost the paradigm of a useless observation. What kind of perfect morality is it that doesn't provide us with an obvious guide to our actions upon which all can agree?

Unseen I wholeheartedly disagree.  How is it useless if it justifies that there can be better moralities that can be sought out?

Perfect morality is an ideal.  It doesn't provide anything.  Are you meaning a perfect moral system?  Because a perfect moral system derives from perfect morality.  Without the ideal of perfect morality given that morality is a concept, there can be no perfect moral system.

How can we know what the perfect morality is given vastly varying perceptions?

John Major, I think we get a better idea of it when we start looking for it in the right way.  Does it make sense that values are measurements?

Stealing is immoral. So how do we punish a two year old for taking a rattle from a one year old? Any idea that is subjective cannot be absolute.

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