I am starting to notice that many of the most extreme variations of people who post on online forums are single and often childless.

Is it possible that the permanence of social network postings will select craziness out the future of human evolution?

For example, it is well known that certain posts can affect your job prospects. Wouldn't some of those same posts affect your ability to find a mate? And with no mate your particular connection to the human gene pool ends, both individually and in the aggregate.

Tags: evolution, extinction, extremism, extremists, modern

Views: 148

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Mel, how are you?

RE: I am starting to notice that many of the most extreme variations of people who post on online forums are single and often childless.

Sounds anecdotal, don't you think?
I'm good, took a break from TA for a while. I'm nearing 50.

To clarify my OP, I am speaking of the types of people who post the most vile stuff, I.e. "Obama is killing your children!" as well as the obsessives who go apeshit with the games like Candy Crush or Bejeweled Blitz, etc.

Certainly the games folks are not hiding in anonymity. They are kind of proud as they plastered my wall with 15-20 posts a day of their conquests.

Anecdotal? I thought so at first, but as I deleted the online extremists from my feed, their seems to be one major condition that connects them all. Forever alone as they say.

For example, it is well known that certain posts can affect your job prospects.

This is true in that a survey by Harris Interactive and CareerBuilder found 48% of employers check or will soon check social media-- LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube-- when screening new employees.

But it's not true (at least for me) in that I only use my real name on LinkedIn and I don't post anything on there except my resume. I don't use Facebook or Twitter. (You don't have a profile on Facebook. Facebook has a profile on you. You don't tweet on Twitter. Twitter tweets on you.) I have no reason to give away that much private information.

Wouldn't some of those same posts affect your ability to find a mate?

Sure. But not necessarily in a negative way. I met my wife online, as did 1 out of 3 Americans who married since 2005. The internet has a way of bringing like-minded people together.

I found my mate online as well, but she was quite appropriate with her online presence.

Those who show their crazy on the outside, yes they might change profiles, hide, etc. But I don't think they want to hide their deeply held beliefs.

But I don't think they want to hide their deeply held beliefs.

Sure. For instance, if someone suggests black people are genetically inferior barbarians, it could cost that person a job, but it might gain the same person that special, racist dreamboat he's waited all his life to meet!

If it was a simple as that then atheists and gay people would not exist today.

I'm speaking of the fringes. Atheists IMHO have always worked undercover. Gays are less likely to have kids these days simply due to being able to out themselves safely. I don't know if that will have any bearing on the future of gays, although I suspect it will.

That must be some pretty good undercover work considering how many atheists are born to highly religious parents in America.Is the average  American atheists like a cuckoo or something?

So population control via email?

Sadly, my brother has four kids, emails, works, shoots guns, kills deer and fishes, and has SKYP. So I wonder about the all important 'statistical trends'?

So maybe Think Atheist should do a deep social study about members, and also suggest this to Facebook. Of course a large study accross the whole culture would be interesting. Is there a correlation between email/internet access and birth rate? What has happened with marriage and email/internet access?

Just asking...

This just popped up on TED, they must have been reading my mind. David Puttnam has an impressive history in film, here is his IMDB. I'm not sure if zombies would exist on film using his philosophy, so I don't know if I am 100% behind him ;)

There are key points at 2:00 and 7:30, but it is still one of the most impressive TED talks I've seen and I've never seen anything that speaks of media's duty to tell the world as they would want it to be.

RSS

Support T|A

Think Atheist is 100% member supported

All proceeds go to keeping Think Atheist online.

Donate with Dogecoin

Members

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Services we love

We are in love with our Amazon

Book Store!

Gadget Nerd? Check out Giz Gad!

Into life hacks? Check out LabMinions.com

Advertise with ThinkAtheist.com

© 2014   Created by Dan.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service