If I were God, I'd know the entire history of the universe forever, future as well as past, I'd also know in advance every one of my own acts.

Oh, but wait, there's a dilemma there, isn't there?

Either God is bound by his future acts and has no free will, or he isn't omniscient at all because he doesn't know the future.

I call this The Problem of Omniscience.

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Simon, you're not making any sense. The meanings of the terms disallow that sort of thing.

What do they disallow?  Why?  

Simon, I'm not sure that explaining it one more time will help you. It's actually pretty straightforward.

Explain it to me.  I never heard it first time around.  

Tom I don't see how your statement makes sense. What you are saying is there is some possible future omniscience doesn't know of.

Maybe I can be clearer:  I know if a drop an egg, it will break. I know if I put the egg in the fridge, it will get cold.  I know the future results of my actions.  I decide either to drop the egg or to put it in the fridge.  I maintain free will (ability to choose my actions) AND the ability to see the future.

Similarly, one can posit that God can see the entire future of the entire Universe if he makes choice A, and the entire *different* future of the entire Universe if he makes choice B.  Thus he is still omniscient - knows everything that will happen if he chooses A and everything that will happen if he chooses B.  And he still has free will: he chooses A or B, and sees the future given either choice.

Of course, this kind of non-falsifiable conjecture is utterly pointless. We may as well be discussing what unicorns would eat if they lived in the center of the Moon.

...one can posit that God can see the entire future of the entire Universe if he makes choice A, and the entire *different* future of the entire Universe if he makes choice B.  Thus he is still omniscient - knows everything that will happen if he chooses A and everything that will happen if he chooses B.  And he still has free will: he chooses A or B, and sees the future given either choice.

BUT, since he's omniscient, he must know in advance what choices he ends up making, and since he knows those choices he's bound by their facticity, and thus has no free will. 

You make a good point. 

Can God be both omnipotent and absent of free will?

Tom,

I take it "California Rolls" are quite tasty. I've never heard of them before now.

And then there is the problem of being "omnipresent" and creating a place called 'hell'.

+1 

Good one!

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