Nietzsche writes in Beyond God and Evil of the 'new philosophers' future atheists who will reject all metaphysical notions, commanders and lawgivers who will live outside the herd concept of morality and have the strength, the will to power, to create their own values.

These new philosophers will say yes to life, yes even to the idea of eternal return because their experiments, their values will justify all of human existence.

With such ideas Nietzsche allows us to ask an amazing question, perhaps the most important question ever asked. The question is this: what undertaking might these new philosophers fabricate for mankind? What non-metaphysical project might these new philosophers give to mankind?

Remember the project would have to be so grand it would retrospectively make the entire history of human suffering worth it.

To put it another way: What shall we do for the next 10,000 years?

Answers on a postcard.

Tags: Nietzsche, art, ethics, philosophy

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Beware of unintended consequences. 

I should have mentioned ITER earlier; a fusion reactor. A real one. It works. (Fusion I mean, not ITER. Not yet.)

You put a tiny little star inside an electromagnetic box. It's not like a steam boiler that turns a turbine to generate electricity. That little baby dumps oodles of raw electricity right into the wires hooked up to the box. No radiation. No waste. No meltdowns.

The problem? Right now it takes more energy to make the electromagnetic box work than you get from the little star inside it. But there seems to be an economy of scale. The bigger the electromagnetic box and star, the more energy you get; size matters. Make it big enough and you'll get a net energy output. Clean, safe, plentiful energy from a fusion reactor that works like the sun.

But the question is: how big? How do you make it work on a larger scale? It's a major scientific challenge. But the United States, European Union, India, Japan, China, Russia, and South Korea decided it has enough promise to team up and collectivity fund ITER with a combined $12 billion.

So we really are working toward an abundant, non-polluting, and relatively cheap source of energy. It might take another fifty (or another hundred) years to become as commonplace as power plants that run on fossil fuels. Or, it may never work at all.

Still, I find it encouraging that the effort is being made at all, and the underlying science is just fascinating; especially the idea that Helium-3 isotopes from the lunar regolith would be an ideal fuel. What a fine reason to continue the international cooperation surrounding ITER and begin a Star Trek-like push into space to colonize the moon.

I think the difference between the Star Trek future and socialism is that the Federation doesn't need to tax everyone and redistribute the wealth to the poor in order to supply their needs. Instead, scientific advances have made energy, food, and other necessities so easily obtainable and plentiful as to be essentially limitless and free to all. So I think it's not so much a political situation as a technological one.

Just ran across this article, Should We Rejoice A Post-Work Future?, from The Daily Beast which might give us much to think about as regards living in a world without having to work.

I really don't mind work much, but having to shut a contracting business down recently, did expose me back to the 'cluster f--k' of a job search. Atleast this time, after being self directed for the better part of 6 years, I'll be ok.

The poor fellow in the vid. My wife watched the vid also, I guess she also had a similar experience, but without the 'distruction of company property', melt down. My favorite movie from the late 90's 'Office Space', has a similar melt down, but with three people taking the offending copy machine and distructively 'disassembling' it in a large field with lots of appropriate hand tools. I think I have matured past thinking of distroying any property. It just costs too much, and I just hate adding to anything like ugliness. Anyway, why distroy the twisted machine when it can be sent to a third world country to be burned or recycled, meeting its just reward...LOL 

commanders and lawgivers who will live outside the herd concept of morality and have the strength, the will to power, to create their own values.

This is already the case.  However, those who have political, economic, and military power don’t tend to be moral paragons.  They tend to be selfish, and more than willing to sacrifice the lives of others for nothing more than their own comfort, or a few digits in their bank accounts.

These new philosophers will say yes to life, yes even to the idea of eternal return because their experiments, their values will justify all of human existence.

The great thinkers of history have always been voices howling in the wilderness.  Those who have had any kind of impact regarding improving conditions for the masses have had their lives ended early.  Considering the widening gap between the haves and have-nots, and the casual attitude toward top-down violence across cultural lines, I don’t see any social renaissance on the horizon.

To put it another way: What shall we do for the next 10,000 years?

Most likely, continue consuming the world’s natural resources at an alarming rate, continue poisoning our skies and waterways, continue killing each other off in the pursuit of tribal superiority, all with the occasional bright spot in the realms of science and art.

I'm hoping for a high-protein, no-fat, pepperjack cheese.  Sounds like a step in the right direction.

RE: "What shall we do for the next 10,000 years?" - I can't speak for anyone else, but I expect to spend the greater part of it, dead --

Yes I expect that the term 'we' is a little fuzzy...

I will be with the Baby Jesus in Heaven for all Eternity.....:P

I heard this before. I think it could be rather dull, you know baby Jesus looking at you, you looking at baby Jesus, nothing much to talk about. He never crys, never has a fit, just a little to much like a still born, but hay it takes all kinds...

Obfuskation ,

I'm hoping for a high-protein, no-fat, pepperjack cheese.  Sounds like a step in the right direction.

And I'm just waiting for my Soylent Green order to arrive from Amazon.com. :D

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