should I worry about my parents kicking me out because of my atheism

My parents are very religious, as well as the rest of my family and my family takes religion very seriously and constantly tell us not to leave the church, although they never tell us what would happen if we left. I worry if my parents learn that I am an atheist they would kick me out of the house, is the possibility of being kicked out plausible? 

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Unfortunately, while you can become what's called "emancipated" (no longer subject to your parents' control), as I understand it, they'd have to agree to it. Like I said, talk to your local child welfare (or protective) services about your rights and options.

I don't think there's anything wrong with (say) giving yourself a pass by not claiming to be a full blown atheist. It's reasonable for people (especially when still young) to say they're just don't know for sure. If parents want to hold your thoughts as ransom, it's only fair for you to not be required to declare status until adulthood.

Technically, I've learned from people here (like Unseen) that to be truly logical and scientific, I'm really an agnostic atheist, meaning I don't claim to know for a fact that God does not exist. (Nor do I claim for a fact that there's not teapot orbiting the sun, or a live, polka-dotted elephant hidden in someone's basement.) I call myself an atheist so I can serve as a good example of what the public might perceive to be an "atheist", because I've also learned that a lot of God fearing people have too many erroneous preconceptions, and some don't even feel it's possible for "real atheists" to exist!

And I'm most definitely not so atheistic as to require my kids to be so, nor did I even tell them I don't believe in God until they eventually asked me. I.e., just like citizens in a free country, children have rights in principle to not be coerced into following the particular religious beliefs of those in power, including parents.

I do agree, there is nothing wrong with not being a full blown atheist, although I have done allot of researching into theories on how we came to being. While I was researching I considered myself an agnostic to stay as neutral as possible and I decided that atheism is the most logical choice. 

I do admit you cannot completely prove that God does or doesn't exist. If I saw some good legitimate and logical evidence for God then yes I would consider that and draw my own conclusion.

If I have kids I would try to teach them about different viewpoints on how we came to being and let them draw their own conclusion instead of being told what to believe.

 

If I have kids I would try to teach them about different viewpoints on how we came to being and let them draw their own conclusion instead of being told what to believe.

Excellent! You sound a lot older than 16 here.

Thanks!

And younger than 23.

If we care about children, we teach them the things we believe.  We teach them what we know about science, and history, and citizenship.  We make them do chores, we tell them to eat healthy, we teach them to manage money frugally.  We prohibit them from using drugs or hanging out with bad friends, we push for good grades and we share the communities that are valuable to us.

We don't do things like teach them some science and some creationism and some voodoo (all different viewpoints) and then let them draw their own conclusions.  That's not love of children, it's indifference.

In the end, children will make their own choices.  They'll do some things better than their parents or teachers, and they'll make some of the mistakes that their parents and teachers tried to prevent.   As a scientist and a Catholic, I've seen young people abandon both and embrace Born Again creationism.   That's the nature of their freedom.  They have that freedom no matter what, just as @Alex does.

The nature of my freedom is that I will never teach them Born Again Creationism, nor place it on an equal footing so as to allow them to choose as though those were equally valuable viewpoints.  That would not be love, nor intellectual integrity.  It would be indifference.

Oh please Dr. Bob. Teaching children to think for themselves is not indifference. That doesn't even make sense.

If we care about children, we teach them the things we believe. 

Yes...brainwashing your children with superstitious fantasies and then kicking them out of their home when they don't buy it is love.

Teaching children every point of view equally and letting them choose is indifference.  You can't honestly tell me that you teach your kids all about Christianity and Islam and Hinduism and western medicine and Scientology and tribal medicine in a neutral way and then let them choose, can you? 

No, we as parents and teachers sift and sort and teach the things that we find most valuable.  I don't teach phlogiston theory or spontaneous generation; I teach thermodynamics and conservation laws and evolution. 

Choosing the things we teach kids is just pragmatism, and has nothing at all to do with not teaching them to think for themselves.  Nor is it brainwashing. Rather, it is empowering them to think for themselves. 

This is what Alex said:

If I have kids I would try to teach them about different viewpoints on how we came to being and let them draw their own conclusion instead of being told what to believe.

The conclusion I drew from that is that it's important to teach children to think for themselves, not just what to believe. Inferring he meant indifference or equally valuable viewpoints adds undo spin to it.

If you believe your rights are being violated, there's always the local ACLU.

Thanks, I will take note.

If they belong to the Westboro Baptist Church: be afraid. Be very afraid. 

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