should I worry about my parents kicking me out because of my atheism

My parents are very religious, as well as the rest of my family and my family takes religion very seriously and constantly tell us not to leave the church, although they never tell us what would happen if we left. I worry if my parents learn that I am an atheist they would kick me out of the house, is the possibility of being kicked out plausible? 

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They can't legally give you the boot until you're eighteen, unless they go through official state channels. Otherwise they're susceptible to abandonment and child endangerment laws. But you don't want to go there anyway. 

I would ask your parents, during a moment of peace and contentment with one another, whether they consider their love for you as their child as unconditional. If they hopefully answer yes, then in the future that can be a point of reference if and when they should ever catch wind of your true inner self. Don't "rock the boat" unless you're prepared and confident in your position as an atheist. I wish you well, Alex.

That is what worries me, I going to pretend to be Catholic until either I can't keep pretending  or they find out I am an atheist. In the meantime I think it would be wise to have some money aside just in case.

Probably a good idea: the reserves anyway. Possibly also make contingency plans with someone you trust just in case.

It can be a tough call when you are young. How well you are received depends so much on the local 'passions' that are involved. I was able to get away with a lot of WTF moments when I was younger, now I am a little more circumspect after a few painful character assasinations directed at me for a public statement.

I remember being grounded by my father after I mentioned that our science club had visited with the local evangelical tent meeting folks for a rather heated debate(in HS). I survived about 6 years in a 1/2:1/2 time share program between a public, and the local catholic school.

I even have a memory going back to about 12, when someone over heard me saying 'Bull-shit', during a catholic summer school class, and being asked to stay home for a week. This was just one more tool for finding effective exits. Found that I could also frost other students by reading science books during class and the bus trip back and forth. I am still amazed how otherwise intelligent kids can asspire to ignorance when they get suckered in to a theist view point. 

To survive, just get smarter. Learn what you can from the theist ideology, and how belief can deface an otherwise good mind. It will make you more adaptable, and might even deepen your charming disposition.

They are not all bad. I finally gave up much of my excess jadedness, and started to find ways to join in humane projects with them. If I don't appear too 'not them', they will mostly accept you.

Sadly I did need to back down a few months ago while attending a local Food Bank meeting, when I introduced myself as a secular humanist. The group's coordinator had made some off-color comment about the 'morality' of humanists. While I could have taken the floor with an ugly tirade, it is also clear that 'doing good' has many faces, and needs all hands.    

I like your advice.

They are not all bad. I finally gave up much of my excess jadedness, and started to find ways to join in humane projects with them. If I don't appear too 'not them', they will mostly accept you.

Sadly I did need to back down a few months ago while attending a local Food Bank meeting, when I introduced myself as a secular humanist. The group's coordinator had made some off-color comment about the 'morality' of humanists. While I could have taken the floor with an ugly tirade, it is also clear that 'doing good' has many faces, and needs all hands.

That's what bugs me the most; when a "leader" or a crowd are set to look down upon others. People just can't leave it to God, but feel they have to participate in their superiorness and peer pressure. I still get more dumbfounded than angry, and have to believe such prejudices (and similar) are naturally built into humans, and that the prejudices need to be overcome via multi-cultural experience with healthy examples of secularism, etc.

In the end, it doesn't matter how religious your parents are, but what kind of people they are. If they are loving and understanding, just explain your doubts and have a serious conversation with them on why you don't believe. Don't rock the boat and try to explain why their religiou isn't true, instead try to explain your feelings and why you are unable to coordinate those with Catholicism. If they want to pray for you, let them; it will give them a feeling of comfort. But what's more, if nothing happens, they will accept that it must be in God's plan and won't give you grief about it. For reference, this is how it went for me.

If your parents are close-minded, then it would indeed be good to save up some money and start looking for ways out that have the least impact on your relation with them.

How old are you, anyway?

I am about a month from sixteen. 

Legally, I doubt if it's possible for them to throw you out. They can make your life miserable, though. Time to talk to your local child welfare services about your rights and options.

I don't know about Georgia but in Louisiana it is possible to go through legal channels to kick your child out of the house and into the custody of the state.  A minor can be removed if found to be incorrigible, i.e. severely and habitually disobedient to parents or guardians.  That requires an established (by police report) pattern of the child hitting, threatening, breaking stuff, or the like.  If they just throw you and your stuff out the front door, they can be charged with child abandonment or endangerment.  

I don't know if refusing to go to church would be enough on its own to classify you as incorrigible.  That probably depends heavily on your local authorities and if/how they chose to write up a report.

Maybe you should bide your time and keep your views to yourself at this point in your life.  You can always express them here on TA and other like-minded websites.  You can find a community here.  But it sounds like the risk is too high for you at home right now.  As far as your family's expectations about attending church, look for something to enjoy about it - the socializing, the pot-luck dinners, whatever positive aspects you see; focus on that and just go through the motions with the rest of it.

 

Thanks for the advice, I plan on not letting them know unless I can't handle pretending like I am a Catholic or I become self sufficient. In the meantime I plan on letting my views out here. 

Adding to Erock's good advice, imo an area where atheists as a group fall short so far is in creating local communities. Religion's been effective at that, especially in charity work. Some atheists/agnostics do go to church just for connection to the local community. In fact I just heard a European claim that religion gains strength in America just because many Americans are so culturally mixed and mobile, moving families around more than in Europe, and so finding a need to join in some kind of local community (which churches best provide here).

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