The Women's Cycling Team of Columbia-- featuring cyclists Angie Rojas, Laura Lozano, Luz Adriana Tovar, Ana Cristina Sanabria, Argenis and Lina Orozco Dueñas-- recently redesigned their team uniforms.

The otherwise conventional spandex bodysuit features Caucasian-colored fabric across the lower torso, creating what critics say is the impression of a bare flesh cut-out revealing the hips, groin and backside. (In fact, the color used in the uniform is gold, which apparently causes problems when captured on some types of cameras.) This business with the uniforms has caused quite a stir:

UCI President Brian Cookson said the women's uniforms were "unacceptable by any standards of decency". Bogota Cycling League President Carlos Orlando Ferreira Pinzón condemned the women's uniforms as "disrespect and mockery."

Are they right? Before you respond, consider the men's cycling kit (shown below) which featured a similar "nude" design and heavily padded crotches. This apparently has gone unnoticed (at least until the fuss started over the women's team).

A hundred years ago, religious denounced women cyclists as immoral, immodest and imprudent:

"...the bicycle is the devil’s advocate agent morally and physically in thousands of instances; therefore be it Resolved, that the Woman’s Rescue League denounces bicycle riding by young women because of producing immoral suggestions and imprudent associations both in language and dress which have a tendency to make women not only unwomanly, but immodest as well."  - Women's Rescue League, 1896 

Even today, in some parts of the world like Afghanistan, woman cyclists are condemned for the same reasons. The rest of the world is more modern, except that it underpays female professional athletes; women earn a fraction of what men are paid for the same sports.

Women's sports are also largely ignored, that is, until someone gets the ridiculous idea that the women are (pretending to be) naked. Maybe an actual naked bicycle race-- for publicity and sponsorship-- would be a fine public relations stunt. It sure works for FEMEN.

Are these women being treated fairly? Are female athletes treated fairly? Why or why not?

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That comment seems rather narrow minded. Humans are sexually aroused by, among other things, genitalia. Clothes can provide, among other things, a suppression of sexual arousal. It could be argued that this has contributed to humanity's cultural and technological evolution.

'The original Olympics were played in the nude.'

The way you've used this sentence to prelude your opinion suggests to me that you consider the Ancient Olympics a moral signpost. 

It seems in the Ancient Olympics women were discriminated against. According to researchers of texts written by Greeks such as Plutarch and Pausanias, married women couldn't compete and the punishment for watching the men compete nude was death. Unmarried women could at least compete (in their own lesser competition dedicated to Hera) and were usually clothed.

"That comment seems rather narrow minded."

No more so then these two individuals: UCI President Brian Cookson said the women's uniforms were "unacceptable by any standards of decency". Bogota Cycling League President Carlos Orlando Ferreira Pinzón condemned the women's uniforms as "disrespect and mockery."

"Humans are sexually aroused by, among other things, genitalia."

Human sexually arousal is not indecent, it is natural.

"Clothes can provide, among other things, a suppression of sexual arousal."

Or clothes can enhance it...so what?  How is either indecent?

"It could be argued that this has contributed to humanity's cultural and technological evolution."

And the opposite can also be argued ie. stem cell research.

'The original Olympics were played in the nude.' The way you've used this sentence to prelude your opinion suggests to me that you consider the Ancient Olympics a moral signpost."

Nope, no moral signpost, just a cultural comment regarding different ideologies during different times.

"It seems in the Ancient Olympics women were discriminated against.According to researchers of texts written by Greeks such as Plutarch and Pausanias, married women couldn't compete and the punishment for watching the men compete nude was death. Unmarried women could at least compete (in their own lesser competition dedicated to Hera) and were usually clothed."

And your point?  Are you trying to suggest it was a good time to be a homosexual male spectator?  Or just a bad time to be a woman?

..................................................................................

The OP's lead question was, ""Nude" women's cycling team uniforms: indecent?"

To that question my answer is NO.  I'm fine if you get aroused looking at six average looking women in spandex, I don't judge you as being indecent just because you find those outfits stimulating.

I should of pointed out that I disagree with the comments from the UCI President and the Bogota Cycling League President as it seems you've assumed the opposite. Describing the uniforms as disrespectful and indecent is foolish and hopefully ultimately irrelevant.

With that said, you'll perhaps read my comments in a different light. I'm not sure if it's wise for you to bring stem cell research in this debate. Clothes have been around for millennia therefore their impact on society is much easier to analyse than new tech such as stem cell research.

You say you mentioned the nudity of male participants in the Ancient Olympics as 'a cultural comment regarding different ideologies during different times'. Well, as the topic of these comments is the alleged nude effect of certain women's uniforms, I would say the additional information regarding nudity in the Ancient Olympics is particularly relevant to your half-truth statement. In fact, perhaps you'd agree that there is a similarity between the two eras of women being treated differently?

So no, I was not trying to discuss homosexuality, or in fact any sexuality. Should I thank you for not judging me to be indecent whilst you assume I'm aroused by these women? I recommend not assuming the sexuality of others.

......

However, if you'd like to play a game of assumptions, then I will take your comment 'Body's aren't indecent, the only indecent thing is the minds of prudes, screw them.' to mean you are comfortable with seeing your family and friends naked. Personally, I'd rather not, but I suppose I'm just a sucker for cultural norms evolved over millennia.

'The Women's Cycling Team of Columbia-- featuring cyclists Angie Rojas Humana Bogota, Laura Lozano, Luz Adriana Tovar, Ana Cristina Sanabria, Argenis and Lina Orozco Dueñas-- recently redesigned their team uniforms.'

I don't think 'Humana Bogota' is one of the cyclists' names. Bogotá is the capital city of Columbia, and Bogotá Humana seems to refer to a set of policies introduced by the government (also the cycling team and maybe other organisations). Apologies, I've never studied Spanish so I'm a bit out of my depth but this page will tell you more: http://www.bogotahumana.gov.co/index.php/2012-01-04-20-46-15/bogota...

If I've sourced the names properly from abc.se, the cyclists of the team are Angie Rojas, Laura Lozano, Luz Adriana Tovar, Ana Cristina Sanabria, Argenis Orozco and Lina Dueñas

That is correctly translated. Gotta love Google translate!

I think you're right. . . . Thanks for pointing that out.

There you go again, GM, trying to pretend that you're open and reasonable when it's really a tactic.

Bogota Humana Ya - is actually an organization focused on improving the democratic nature of the city, focused on the environment, human rights... etc.

http://www.bogotahumana.gov.co/index.php/2012-01-04-20-46-15

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