Recent evidence suggests that black holes do not absorb Dark matter.

This gives the mystery of dark matter even greater pinions, since the plate like motion of  spiral galaxies has been attributed to dark matter in defiance of Newtonian physics.

This may allude to an underlying structure to galaxies far more complex than predicted by the current theories of cosmology. Recent papers, including the one reference in the attached article below are discovering structure and order to the assemblage of black holes with it's conjugate dark matter halo. 

 

My personal view is that the Dark matter halo may be connected to the black hole via hyperspace, vis-à-vis a halo occuring as an antecedent shadow/ projection from the hypersphere of space-time itself, carrier of cosmic inflation. 

http://www.universetoday.com/60422/astronomers-find-black-holes-do-...

Astronomers Find Black Holes Do Not Absorb Dark Matter

by NANCY ATKINSON on MARCH 22, 2010

Artist’s schematic impression of the distortion of spacetime by a supermassive black hole at the centre of a galaxy. The black hole will swallow dark matter at a rate which depends on its mass and on the amount of dark matter around it. Image: Felipe Esquivel Reed.

There’s the common notion that black holes suck in everything in the nearby vicinity by exerting a strong gravitational influence on the matter, energy, and space surrounding them. But astronomers have found that the dark matter around black holes might be a different story. Somehow dark matter resists ‘assimilation’ into a black hole.
 
About 23% of the Universe is made up of mysterious dark matter, invisible material only detected through its gravitational influence on its surroundings. In the early Universe clumps of dark matter are thought to have attracted gas, which then coalesced into stars that eventually assembled the galaxies we see today. In their efforts to understand galaxy formation and evolution, astronomers have spent a good deal of time attempting to simulate the build up of dark matter in these objects.

Dr. Xavier Hernandez and Dr. William Lee from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) calculated the way in which the black holes found at the center of galaxies absorb dark matter. These black holes have anything between millions and billions of times the mass of the Sun and draw in material at a high rate.

The researchers modeled the way in which the dark matter is absorbed by black holes and found that the rate at which this happens is very sensitive to the amount of dark matter found in the black holes’ vicinity. If this concentration were larger than a critical density of 7 Suns of matter spread over each cubic light year of space, the black hole mass would increase so rapidly, hence engulfing such large amounts of dark matter, that soon the entire galaxy would be altered beyond recognition.

“Over the billions of years since galaxies formed, such runaway absorption of dark matter in black holes would have altered the population of galaxies away from what we actually observe,” said Hernandez

Their work therefore suggests that the density of dark matter in the centers of galaxies tends to be a constant value. By comparing their observations to what current models of the evolution of the Universe predict, Hernandez and Lee conclude that it is probably necessary to change some of the assumptions that underpin these models – dark matter may not behave in the way scientists thought it did.

There work appears in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.


The team’s paper can be found here. 

Below is a simulation of the rotations of a hypersphere projected into 3-space. 

 

 

Tags: black, dark, hole, hyperspace, hypersphere, matter

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Making up theories is the easy part of progress.

The article is a little suggestive or maybe I'm overreacting to the word "absorb." My understanding is that the model of Hernandez and Lee put constraints on the density gradient of the dark matter halo up to a maximum of about 7 solar masses per cubic light year in the galaxy core.

It might also suggest (low) interaction beside gravitationally with baryonic matter.

http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2010/03/dark_matter_we_dont...

Making up theories is the easy part of progress.

The article is a little suggestive or maybe I'm overreacting to the word "absorb." My understanding is that the model of Hernandez and Lee put constraints on the density gradient of the dark matter halo up to a maximum of about 7 solar masses per cubic light year in the galaxy core.

The point is that you can not exceed that mass without collapsing the galaxy, but what is stopping it?


It might also suggest (low) interaction beside gravitationally with baryonic matter.

 

But that would be a paradox. It interacts with stars to induce plate motion of the galaxy and yet does not interact with the black hole. In the standard model all mass baryonic or non-baryonic warp space time to produce gravity and consequently, attraction.  This is why I conjecture that the halo is antecedent to the black hole and thus feed by it through hyperspace. The non baryonic halo, a sustained projection from hyperspace. 

 

The paper doesn't say dark matter doesn't get trapped inside a black hole, what is says is that according to their calculations the amount of dark matter in the vicinity of the black hole can't have a density that is higher than about 7 solar masses per cubic lightyear of dark matter (spread out evenly of course.)

The general idea is this:

http://abyss.uoregon.edu/~js/ast222/

In our Milky Way galaxy core around it's central black hole there is a ring of extremely low density (of "normal" or baryonic matter.) The density peaks at about 1,5 light-year from the core and then drops sharply toward the black hole.

So all the paper does is to put limits on the density gradient of the dark matter cloud, to allow for what we actually observe. There is no paradox or any real mystery in the sense that these findings conflict with the dark matter hypothesis. Instead it just helps us to understand more about the nature of dark matter.

This should not stop you from conjecturing all you want, but you must work it out, show it fits all actual observations and then propose experiments that produces outcomes that distinguish unequivocally between your idea and (preferably) all other ideas and then become a familiar face in physics textbooks.

For now I have no clue what you are talking about and what you mean by hyperspace. The only way I understand hyperspace is as a mathematical tool that can be helpful in n-dimensional calculations.

Hyperspace simply refers to including unseen dimension(s) in addition to what is seen.

Theoritically the universe is expanding allegorically on the surface of a balloon thus explaining how the universe could expand faster than the speed of light during the big bang. ( I know this elementary to you, just explaining what I meant). Therefore I am applying this unseen dimension as a degree of freedom in the relationship between the black hole and it's conjugate halo.

The physics extended to including this additonal dimension could lead to a steady state solution with the black hole feeding the halo through hyperspace and the halo feeding the blackhole or at steady steady state, the mutual feeding halts. This steady state conditon gives rise to the  maximum of about 7 solar masses per cubic light year in the galaxy core.

I use feeding very losely since it would be just one object in hyperspace with variable density coming into equilibrium after tidal oscillations ( In this model, matter beyond the event horizon become non-baryonic. An experiment could be set up to detect any remnant of any tidal oscillations in the halo.

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