I want to hear which you think is better, real reasons please. Not just, well I think Mac is stupid and for hipsters..or Aw PCs are for poor people..or crap like that. Thank you :)

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bingo. There are so many PC users out there who desperately want to justify their usage of crap bloatware, ugly interface, unsympathetic software and overall impoverished user-experience.

My Mac was bought online and I've never had any issue getting things taken care of in the store, nor have I had bad customer service. Dealing with the customer service for my Alienware is a different story. 

I've had Macs since the 90's - I've NEVER had one crash. unlike Windows machines, where rebooting is SOP.

Another possibility is that we Mac users are so pleased with what we have, that we want to shout it from the rooftops, eliminating shutting "the fuck up" as an optiion --

errmmm, why would they go on about it if the user-experience was not infinitely better. I use both and there is simply no comparison.

This is from the OurBedOfNails.com blog. It covers the Apple product line in general so it gets into Android as well, since Apple's main competitor in the cell phone world is Google.

Apple Creaks Along Into Its Late Middle Age

If you had asked anyone even just a decade ago if Apple Computers would become the richest corporation in history, you’d have received a huge round of guffaws from a skeptical financial community. Overthrow the likes of Exxon? You need to get your head examined.

But then Steve Jobs got busy and along came items like the iPod, iPhone, and iPad, and of course their anchor product, the MacBook laptop computer. Their interfaces are well-known for their ease of use, which might be described as “so easy, a caveman can use it.” Apple users have actually been encouraged to be proud of NOT knowing how a computer works on the inside. As a long-time Windows user, I know a bit about the hardware and softwRE architecture of my computers. Were I an Apple user, I’d be happily ignorant of things like drivers, DLL’s,

Apple users have smugly asserted that their computers are immune to viruses and malware. That’s only true to a degree, and mostly because the Apple user has tended to be a small target, a relatively poor student or a small business. For every Mac, it’s been estimated there are around seven PC’s out there. If you’re shooting critters against the side of a barn, it’s much easier to hit a fox than a rat. Relatively speaking, Mac’s simply haven’t been worth the effort of the bad guys.

There has been a belief propagated by Apple users that Apple hardware is better and more reliable than that of its PC rivals, but that simply isn’t true. Apple computers are made in the same Chinese factories making HP, Dell, and other PC’s. Apples arrive DOA and fail at much the same rate as Windows machines. Its so-called “geniuses” offering Apple support in the stores are the same sort of guys working down the street at the computer repair store. Some good, some brilliant, and some totally incompetent.

However, that is changing and now Mac users should be running anti-bad guys software, too.

If Apple only made computers, it wouldn’t be the success it is. Steve Jobs steered Apple in totally new directions with its non-computer products, especially the iPhone at first, but then the iPad.

Speaking of software, while we talk in terms of Mac’s, iPods, iPhones, and iPads, it’s really the software which has made Apple the success it is. As I said, the hardware is rather pedestrian and not all that different from what you can get in the Windows world. It has a certain consistent look to it because if there’s one area where Apple wins hands down, it’s in the consistency of their products appearance. They all look sleek and well-made, but that’s mostly just for show. Looking better doesn’t make them better.

More than anything else, it’s been the iPhone which has propelled Apple to become the richest corporation in the world. However, along comes Google with its Android phones. Suddenly, the iPhone doesn’t look like the unique world-beater it once was, and I’m not even referring to Steve Jobs’ “Your holding the phone the wrong way” defense of his phone having a poor reception problem and dropping lots of calls.

Take my phone for example, it’s an HTC EVO 4G 3D. Yes, it does take actual 3D photos and videos viewable on the phone itself. No iPhone can do that yet. Its 4.3″ display is noticeably larger than the iPhone’s 3.5″ display. The pixel density on the iPhone is technically better, but most people won’t notice the difference unless the phones are actually displaying the same image side-by-side.

Yes, Apple phones have quite a few more apps than Android phones, but many of those apps overlap each other with slight differences in features. The more desirable ones are also available for Android phones, or else there’s an equivalent or better one. Perhaps the several Siri-like programs for Android aren’t quite as good yet, but then Siri isn’t all that good, either. Entire blogs are devoted to the dumb things Siri sometimes says. And let’s face it, what can Siri tell you that you can’t find quickly and with better accuracy using software that isn’t voice-based?

Apple’s browser, Safari, is just okay. Most Apple users end up with Firefox or, embarrassingly to Apple, Google’s Chrome as their everyday browser.

And let’s not even get into the Apple Maps stumble, which forced Apple to go back to the maps application of its archrival, Google Maps. In case you don’t know what the problems were, this page should be good for some laughs.

Apple loses more market share to Android phones every day, and there are no rumors of any sort of killer advance to be offered in opposition to Android. And now we have the entry of phones and tablets running neither Apple’s OS nor Android but Windows. The Windows phones are slow to take off, but Windows is a very familiar OS, so expect Windows phones to gain market share as time goes by, if only gradually.

And speaking of Windows, it must be noted that the usual jab against Windows versions of the past, that it was buggy and crashed a lot, isn’t heard so much anymore because Microsoft has made a huge and very successful effort to provide a dependable OS. Starting with Vista, and even more so with improvements of Windows 7, it now works quite well with minimal annoyance, and what annoyances are left are usually easily swept away. Windows 8 is taking off a bit slower than Microshoped, but that is largely due to the radically different interface which takes a little time to learn to use effectively. Time will tell if Windows 8 works well enough on a small screen to penetrate the smartphone market, though.

And much the same is happening in the Android world with a plethora of tablets with advanced features being offered by a variety of competitors. You see, Android is an open system. Unlike Apple’s almost military control over its hardware, software, and apps, Android is open with Google neither approving nor disapproving of the products Android developers come up with. Each new update of the iPad so far is just an upgrade of the same basic design, whereas Android tablets offer a wide variety of options and features offering some real choices.

At one end consider the 7″ cameraless Nook HD which, along with its new big brother the HD+, has a display resolution about equal to the “Retina Display” touted on the latest iPads, but with a detuned and Nookified version of Android designed to make it a very fancy Barnes & Noble-oriented eReader with some Android features. At the far other end you have the Google Nexus 10 with front and back cameras as well as a 2560 x 1600 display resolution leaving the iPad’s 2048 x 1536 and the Nook HD+’s 1900×1280 display resolutions in the dust and at a price, $399, which makes it a far better value than the iPad. (It should be noted that the Nook HD+ has a 9″ display not the 10″ of the iPad and Nexus 10, making its resolution quite comparable.)

There is talk of an Apple watch on the horizon, with supposed (or speculated) features like seeing text messages and getting GPS-based local information on one’s wrist. Apple under Jobs was known for, as some have said, “products we didn’t know we needed until we saw them.” Frequently, those needs have been along the lines of needing to be an early adopter of new technologies, but not always. The iPhone was more than merely cool. It made many people’s lives easier and better. It remains to be seen if a high-tech wristwatch can do that. Perhaps if you can use it to make voice calls or conduct voice-directed text messaging while driving. Without something like that, it might turn into one of Apple’s many (but easily forgotten) flops.

At this time, Google is gaining ground on Apple. For a long time I went with PC’s rather than Macbooks and Android phones rather than iPhones for fear that Apple was taking over the world. Now, it’s starting to look like Google might do that instead. At least Google is an open system and doesn’t try to manage things to trap the world into using its own products—or those it approves—exclusively. Many of us view that sort of thing as belonging within our own sphere of control, not that of the device’s manufacturer.

I’m a lot more comfortable with Google than Apple, so I’m not unhappy to see Apple going into gradual decline.

On the other hand, Apple has surprised us before, but with Steve Jobs at the helm of product imagining and development. He may have left a couple projects yet to be seen in the development stage, and we may see a few of those in the next few years.

The question is, can Apple keep up with Google and Microsoft without Steve Jobs. I don’t think so.

As a counter to the gripes about the Apple map stuff, sometime between last June and today, Google maps finally quit labeling US-24 through Colorado Springs, Colorado as "US-24 in Illinois."

They are well known for showing highway designators that haven't existed in 50 years even when they do have the right state.  Just for instance "State Highway 217" hasn't existed since 1964 at the latest.

For a lot of us, while Macs are okay, it's the price problem that keeps us from being Mac users. I can go to TigerDirect.com any day of the week and find fairly nice little computers, comparable in performance to a Macbook, at 1/2 to 1/3 the price. But then Mac blindsides you with oddball connectors and devices that do the same thing as a PC equivalant at 2 to 3 times the price. Your Mac routers run $75-$265 ($265?!!!). By contrast, I'm using a perfectly good (and equivalent wireless "n") $28 Netgear router. 

It's pretty clear how Apple became (temporarily) the richest corporation in the world: a stupid user base consisting of early adopter spendthrifts. 

In a few years, Samsung may usurp Apple's place in the high tech personal technology world.

If I had a specific CPU feature on my current system I would have been able to boot and compare Windows 7, Windows 8, Mac OS X, and LInux. As it is I cannot add OS X to the list right now (though I'm planning a system upgrade). I already multiboot the rest. As a systems programmer who has been at this since the 1980s I find the the current Mac operating system pleasant enough, but for development work it's cost prohibitive for me to acquire the necessary hardware/software/documentation to get started at the moment. Apple simply prices themselves out of a competitive advantage. If they got rid of the monopolistic practices they would find themselves with a much larger available software/hardware base for their customers. As it is it's only their "i" products that's making them the lion's share of their profits. I have an insider that admits that Apple markets their products in a manner that promotes arrogance among the users. It appeals to people based on emotional elements rather than technical capability. 

On the other hand, Linux has a different following that follows a simple creed: "Microsoft = evil". They simply go with a belief that has grown increasingly dated and absurd. I recently found it amazing that when I tried the trial version of Windows 8 Enterprise Edition that it actually booted and was ready faster than the latest build of Ubuntu Linux! Under the hood Windows 7 and 8 are vastly different beasts with only a cosmetic layer between them when you are in desktop mode. I also found 8 to be more stable. I did get it to "blue screen", but what it displayed was more elegant and friendly (but with less helpful information). Mac OS X and Ubuntu I have both found to have a problem with system crashes - they both tend to literally freeze the computer requiring a power off/on cycle to recover. 

Linux users often tend to be younger than myself and tend to think line commands are the way to go not realizing why operating system developers dropped that interface as the primary means of system control in favor of GUIs. Why? Because of the visual nature of human thinking and memory. It also protects against typographic errors (which can be a disaster!) and having to recall a long list of obtuse (and often cryptic) command strings. Mac OS X and Windows (all versions) still retain a command line option because often software developers implement command line only settings for their products (probably those who develop first under Linux!)

 

RE: "Mac OS X and Ubuntu I have both found to have a problem with system crashes - they both tend to literally freeze the computer requiring a power off/on cycle to recover."

I've used OS X since it first came out, and I have never encountered this problem.

I used to do volunteer service work at an Einstein Bros coffee shop in St. Louis that was operated by the downtown Marriott hotel. I was good friends of the store manager and I could use the machines without prior purchase and often from store open to store close. They had a couple of Macs running OS X and I would frequently use them to to play the game RuneScape - this particular Java/browser game I found could literally lock the computer up solid. And it happened quite frequently. When the cursor would no longer respond to any mouse movement,no action of the keyboard would prompt any response, and none of the windows or software that were supposed to be active were doing anything - not even the "pinwheel" cursor present to indicate that at least the computer was doing something, I'd say it was quite locked up. And it happened across both machines. This not the only software that caused such lockups either, but I'm at a loss so many years later to identify all of the culprits. I think the last version that was installed was Mountain Lion at the time. It's likely because of the Linux-type OS core it uses (and I did access the command prompt on those machines because sometimes I would do diagnostic work that way so felt often like I WAS on Linux despite Apple's claims otherwise :p )

I don't know what you are doing with your machine, but I tend to push mine to their max when I can - I'm a game and software developer and I tend make machines scream and beg for mercy. :D

On the other hand, Linux has a different following that follows a simple creed: "Microsoft = evil". They simply go with a belief that has grown increasingly dated and absurd.

The word 'creed' implies a kind of irrational belief, as if Microsoft did not have a long history of open warfare against Linux and the open source software community. That history includes years of financial backing for the SCO unix litigation to seize control of Linux based on bogus allegations of copyright infringement.

Microsoft's recent efforts include a push to get PC hardware makers to ensure their products boot Windows and nothing else. This is "dated" enough for the Linux community to realign resources at the highest levels to deal with the issue as recently as last week, and "absurd" enough to present a potentially existential threat to the future of Linux unless properly handled.

I recently found it amazing that when I tried the trial version of Windows 8 Enterprise Edition that it actually booted and was ready faster than the latest build of Ubuntu Linux!

If you say so. In a production server environment, with all the security that has to load in Windows 8, in addition to the GUI, and then all the kitchen sink crap you can't shut off? I'll believe that when I see it.

I'll take Debian or CentOS over Windows 8 Enterprise Whatever anytime. There is a reason the busiest web sites in the world, in addition to over 85% of the world's web servers overall, aren't running Windows. And it's not because Windows is faster.

Ubuntu I have both found to have a problem with system crashes - they both tend to literally freeze the computer requiring a power off/on cycle to recover. 

Again, if you say so.

I've seen applications crash on Linux but never once have I seen Linux crash or hang on a system that met the minimum requirements to run it. As a matter of technical excellence, that's impressive as hell, so I'll say it again at risk of belaboring the point.

Never once, in over 250,000 data center server operating hours I have observed, have I ever known a Linux server to crash or hang due to an operating system fault.

Regarding Windows? Well, if you can't say something nice...

Linux users often tend to be younger than myself and tend to think line commands are the way to go not realizing why operating system developers dropped that interface as the primary means of system control in favor of GUIs.

I haven't found this to be the case at all. Most of the Linux users I encounter are aged 35 and up, and tend to be throwbacks from the old Internet, or people with a compsci or ecomm background (like yours truly). It's also a common misconception that Linux requires a command line interface. It doesn't. Linux has desktop environments that are virtually identical to OSX, multiple versions of Windows, and several other options you can't get anywhere else. Linux is easy to use. My daughter started using Linux when she was a toddler. My 87-year-old aunt uses it too. I gave her one lesson and said call anytime if you need help. She's never needed it.

Mac OS X and Windows (all versions) still retain a command line option because often software developers implement command line only settings for their products (probably those who develop first under Linux!)

Command lines are so much faster and more powerful for some tasks. Systems where speed is at an absolute premium (such as with busy web servers) shed the GUI and leave the bare essentials to squeeze out as much performance as possible.

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Mac Vs PC

Started by Autumn Morales. Last reply by kris feenstra Apr 6, 2013. 94 Replies

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