Isn't "IQ" rather arbitrary and dependent upon which series of tests are taken? How can estimates of the IQs of dead people make any sense if the number itself doesn't mean much.

I turned off the estimated link provided when it claimed that the (small sample) average score for soldiers was 133. As one with access to all records in the Marine Corps office, I'd estimate the average to be closer to 105 - which is close enough to what is considered to be, by definition, the overall population average, right?.

I'd always heard that "genius" was above 160, but then it doesn't make sense that Einstein was 160. He's the paragon of  "genius". I'd have thought that Einstein would be approaching the level of H3xx at 180.

I know what my military test score was (it was called GCT, I think), but what is it a count of? I've just sent an email to Mensa asking what a Mensa score means. I believe membership is Mensa indicates top 2%. But I wonder if there's a number associated with that.

Who knows what IQ means = (outside "Intelligence Quotient")?

Tags: genius, intelligence, tests

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Creating requires a desire or need to rebel. I have that in spades doubled.

Here's one of my non-haiku:

English, our language, / Has two excellent uses, / Poetry and fraud.

Also, the best artists are risk takers. That is a key part of being creative: risking doing something that's never been done before. Also, risking revealing something about oneself. 

Hmmm. It sure fite me. I have NEVER had the need to rebel (in personal relationships; in terms of politics, save a place for me on the first rank. I don't go out of my way to avoid risks, but I certainly don't seek them.

Mike, your reply seems ambiguous. I can't tell if you agree or disagree. At any rate, I think it's self-evident that great creative advances often require courage. Also, many great works of art happen when artists are brave enough to reveal their inner lives in their art.

"I can't tell if you agree or disagree."

That's because it's new information for me. Don't have an opinion yet. Just saying it fits (typo fite) me.

"risking revealing something about oneself"

THAT also fits, but more so, I think, because I've always gone under the assumption that one can never know oneself. 

"risks, but I certainly don't seek them"

Um, wait, maybe I do - if it's for fun!

I passed the test about 20 years ago, but, again, I don't know my actual score (yet). I would HAVE to be right on the cusp. I refer to myself as the world's stupidest Mensan.  I still find it confusing that there are numbers of people with higher IQs than Einstein who haven't revolutionized their field of endeavour as he did.

Just being smart isn't enough. You also have to have the drive, the fascination to devote yourself to a field. If someone has an IQ of 250 but is perfectly satisfied and happy with being an A/C repairman, they are unlikely to make any groundbreaking discoveries. Intelligence is necessary but not sufficient.

I do agree that the tests are pretty arbitrary, and exclusive to those who have been college educated. For example, I know of some brilliant people with a 1st grade education (from a third world country btw) that may actually be considered a genius but because they haven't had the academia to allow them the ability to take a test like mensa, they are immeasurable by our standards. This is one things that is frustrating to me about the whole concept of the "IQ"...it is for those with enough money to afford books and tuition. How fair is that?

This is one things that is frustrating to me about the whole concept of the "IQ"...it is for those with enough money to afford books and tuition. How fair is that?

Two things: 1) You've never heard of scholarships? They are even available to foreigners and they do not always rely totally on test scores if the institution feels the person can be brought up to speed. 2} Hopefully one gets a higher education for some purpose other than getting into Mensa or obtaining a high IQ score.

Hopefully one gets a higher education for some purpose other than getting into Mensa or obtaining a high IQ score.

Agreed. Learn for learning's sake, and do something to help the world. After all, IQ is really just a number, and it fluctuates. It's not something you're born with, it's something you can cultivate.

"It's not something you're born with"

I don't agree. Perhaps one could gain a couple points through mental exercises or lose a couple through atrophy, but no more that a couple.

"it's something you can cultivate"

From that perspective one could reasonably be proud of their IQ. Like my perfect pitch, I consider my intelligence to be a "gift" (forget the religious implications) - not something I can take credit for achieving.

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