~There is an innocence in admiration; it is found in those to whom it has never yet occurred that they, too, might be admired some day.

Friedrich Nietzsche~


If you could return to innocence, would you? They say "ignorance is bliss," but I also say "innocence is blisss."

Do the things that you know about the world become burdensome? Once you learn certain things about the world (or about yourself) it changes you forever. Sometimes for the better, sometimes......maybe not so much.

If you could return to innocence, would you?

Do you think innocence and ignorance are synonymous?

I long to go back to innocence. But I constantly reap the benefits of wisdom too..... It's the things I know that haunt me. But what you don't know can't hurt you......or can it?

What do you think?

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If ignorance really had been bliss there would be a lot more happy people around.

Ignorance and innocence are not synonymous, though they are far from antonyms. For instance, it's a fairly common belief that some of the fucked up things governments do are done because governments are malicious, while I believe it is because they are incompetent. One of these beliefs is probably ignorant. On the other hand, believing that the government is always looking after your interests is clearly a very innocent belief, though not necessarily completely wrong. 

In any event, innocence sounds very boring to me, though I am sure there's a number of things to which I am innocent and would be shocked to learn the truth.

I can't imagine wanting to know less. The naive, like kids, rely on older experience and wisdom to support their survival, so I'd also feel like I was letting down others and future others if I took a step away from real life just for myself (unless it's just for temporary psyche recharging).

Now, a kind of pathological aspect of seeking to know everything can go badly, such as in people who pursue beliefs in things that aren't true. In those cases, I wish they'd just revert back to childhood innocence so we could start over with them.

I don't like feeling naive, and I intensely dislike societal drives to remain ignorant of the world, e.g. with work, boob tube, work, boob tube, feeding the pro-ignorance mass media daily with eyeballs. (Does that make sense?) My pets (when I've had them) can remain innocent and dependent upon me, but that's it.

Intellectually, I understand your point, but I can't imagine that everything you know has added to your wisdom. I just don't agree that all things should be known. Knowledge is infinitely vast in it's scope, ranging anywhere from your neighbor's favorite color or sex position to cutting edge quantum physics. Some knowledge does not add to your wisdom, but subtracts from your humanity----and then there is level of knowledge to take into account. For instance, is it enough to know that, say, there are evil (not in the religious sense) people out there who will do unspeakably torturous acts to other people just for their own selfish pleasure, or would you need to know what specific things are done and in what manner, OR would you need to know what it is like to witness a person being disemboweled in the most excruciating way while they are still alive? It's all out there for the voyeuring. There's a reason TMI is such a cliché these days. There is information out there that many of us not only don't want to know, but shouldn't. I don't speak in terms of regulation or censorship, but in people having SOME restraint. Is wishing I hadn't seen some of the things I have regressive? Not in my mind.

True. To be honest, I don't like rape scenes on TV. There many be a few things I wish I could unsee. But it's not as extreme as going back in time to young innocence.

And I don't plan on watching two girls one cup. But I've set it up on my laptop and flipped it around to watch the reaction of others!

I've learned something from watching Two Girls One Cup.  I don't want to watch Two Girls One Cup. 

Seriously, I think almost all information has value to me, just some of it not very much. 

I couldn't get that video out of my head or the bottom of my stomach for weeks.

Just as every piece of evidence and data adds to science, every bit of knowledge adds to wisdom. It may be a lot or only a little. Even such things as bearing witness to repetitive senseless atrocities serves the purpose of increasing understanding of the depth and scope of atrocity on a larger human scale; that is wisdom, though unpleasant. Avoidance of knowledge is denial of reality.

Point taken. Just as "every man has his price", we all have our own threshold of denial. I think I've found where mine is. I have no more appetite for some sorts of knowledge. I believe my understanding of the depths of depravity that humans can go to is sufficient. If not, I can always count on the next wave of gory flicks, the next TV show about serial killing, or the next news story about child abduction to reinforce my cynicism.

Yes, I agree. Personally I go through periods where I don't think I can stomach another news story about senseless violence in the streets.  But I'm glad somebody pays attention and studies those things.  It would be easy to dismiss this incident as just two more animals doing what they do; toss that story on the pile with the rest.  Maybe that's true, but maybe there are overarching patterns or causal influences that go deeper and broader than the cursory conclusions one can draw from each individual incident.  Sometimes it helps me process it all if I can place it in a larger context.  To me, that's how knowledge becomes wisdom.

All true and well said, Erock. Maybe I have just been in a disgusted-with-the-world mood. lol There IS a lot to be disillusioned over.

~There is an innocence in admiration; it is found in those to whom it has never yet occurred that they, too, might be admired some day.

Friedrich Nietzsche~

This reminds me of my favourite quote from Pulp Fiction. 

WINSTON

You hear that, young lady?
Respect.  You could learn a lot
from those two fine specimens.
Respect for one's elders shows
character.
 

RAQUEL

I have character.

 
WINSTON

Just because you are a character
doesn't mean you have character.

To the extent that innocence and ignorance are the same, I would not want innocence.  Ignorance can hurt you a great deal.  Nor would I want innocence alone--primarily because that would mean that I would have to go through the process of disillusionment all over again.

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