NOTE: This thread does not flame against Atheism, but it does criticise it. It displays my definition of Atheism which seems to be not for the general public. If you can't deal with criticism towards Atheism you are in the wrong discussion.

Additionally the fear of extremism is directly linked to very seemingly possible distant futures NOT THE NEXT 2 YEARS.

 

 

 

First of all I would like to say I am mostly against all sorts of organized religions, but in fact I am agnostic. (meaning I dont admit defeat to any superpower untill there is enough evidence to support it)

 

In my opnion there is a big issue that does not tend to be adressed with religion in the right way. People always complain about how close minded religion really is and that most of their followers are just blindly pusuing the herd. Though how much "better" is atheism really?

 

Atheism is by my language's definition a religion itself. The translated definition of religion in German and Dutch state that a belief turns into a religion once the belief itself sets an definition of how the world works.

 

People think atheism is about the "we dont know" factor, but it is not. Atheism preeches the "We know YOU are wrong" factor.

 

I absolutely agree with the fact that atheism not being an organized religion (yet) gives it a higher level logical acceptance, but where is it going?

 

Atheism used to be the outcast lunatics hanged to death. Now there are groups forming all over the world  with "logical leaders" behind it. I honestly think atheistm is goign in the same direction as all other religions are going right now. How far do you think you are of having atheism's jehovas whitnesses at your door? I have listened to my lesser educated/informed friends rampage about religion after having seen one biased documentary (Religulous). They were making statements such as, "I am gonna kill all those who believe in religion" etc. This is nothing more than atheist extremism. Even on this webiste it seems that some topics are purely places here ase a response to rage/anger against religious people.

 

This brings you to the discussion that  should be here, maybe even istead of this entire website (not hating at the website, this place is great), "Are we too unintelligent?"

 

The reason people follow blindly what is set right infront of them is because they are uninformed and scared of complecated explanations that undermine the value of their own existence in this universe.

 

Religion is part of the problem, but education is in an infinitely worse state.

 

(Again I am not hating at atheism, as I am far more happy with it that even Buddism, but merely pointing out a more pressing issue. Next year Ill be attending univesity where I hope to find more who have brought themselves up to date with the real issues)

 

*EDIT: removed the word absolute from the definition of atheism, this is not correct.

*EDITEDIT:Updated description

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Their is a huge difference between a philosophy and a religion. Can you guess what it is?

 

That's right: belief in a deity.

 

Yes, philosophy and religion are similar, but they are distinct from each other in that one way. No deity, no religion. It's that simple.

I don't follow your meaning.  That distinction seems to defy common terminology.  

 

Theology is usually grouped under metaphysics, which, as I'm sure you are aware, is a pretty well established branch of philosophy.   While religion and philosophy mean different things, the subject matter they both deal with has overlapping areas.  A set of beliefs can simultaneously be a philosophy and a religion.

I never said they didn't overlap. Indeed, they are quite similar. But "religion" includes belief in a deity, philosophy does not. That may be the only difference, but it is an obvious difference.

 

Religion and philosophy are both views about the world and how we should live and so on. But only religion has belief in deities.

This still isn't clear.  Are you saying:

a) philosophy does not necessarily include (belief in) deities, or

b) philosophy never includes (belief in) deities

 

The former is true; the latter is not.

B. It is true. Once you include belief in deities, you go from philosophy too religion.

 

Take Buddhism for example. In the West, it is a philosophy, because no one actually believes in the deities. In the East, however, deities are included, and it is considered a religion.

 

Any religion can be a philosophy: just remove the belief in Deities (Humanistic Judaism, Western Buddhism, etc). The opposite, however, is also true: any philosophy becomes a religion once you add the belief in deities.

 

Or, put another way: a philosophy is no longer a philosophy when you include belief in deities; it has become a religion.

I don't know where you got this definition, but it's factually incorrect.  Theology is a part of philosophy.  It's not a field I personally see value in, but that doesn't change its nature.

I don't know where you got this definition, but it's factually incorrect.  Theology is a part of philosophy.  It's not a field I personally see value in, but that doesn't change its nature.

You're misunderstanding me. I'm not talking about philosophy as a study of general and fundamental problems. What I'm talking about is the grouping around the philosophical answers to some of those problems that does not qualify as a religion due to the lack of belief in a higher power or powers, such as Secular Humanism.

This doesn't address the point I've raised.  Yes, secular humanism is a philosophy.  It is also not a religion.  This has nothing to do with the fact that it doesn't involve deities.  Christian humanism is also a philosophy, and is not, in itself, a religion (at least not as far as I know).  It does involve a deity.

 

Anyway, I'm clear on what you mean now.  It's not really an important issue to me beyond that.

This doesn't address the point I've raised.  Yes, secular humanism is a philosophy.  It is also not a religion.  This has nothing to do with the fact that it doesn't involve deities.  Christian humanism is also a philosophy, and is not, in itself, a religion (at least not as far as I know).  It does involve a deity.

 

If Christian Humanism involves a deity, then it would be a religion. It may take a philosophical approach, but, ultimately, it's a religion.

 

The fact that Secular Humanism does not involve deities is why it's not a religion but, instead, a philosophy.

 

Anyway, I'm clear on what you mean now.  It's not really an important issue to me beyond that.

 

Fair enough.

Correct me if I misrepresent your point, I just figured I'd try rephrasing it. Theology is a subcategory of Philosophy. In other words, all religions are philosophies, but not all philosophies are religions - just like all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares.

Yea I should've figured this community would get defensive and totally ignore my main point given in the discussion topic.

 

You can lock the discussion as people cant get over themselves (like many religious people) to not immediately get defensive when I criticise their beliefs.

No one is  getting defensive Kim, they simply corrected you. While some people seem to treat atheism like a belief system and so it is an easy mistake to make to call it one. However how some people seem to treat atheism does not change the definition of the word.

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