Some businesses readily demonstrate a preference for religiosity or have overtly religious management teams. One example is Chick-fil-A which cites religion as reasons for closing on Sunday and opposing gay marriage.

1. Are you, as a consumer, less likely to spend at a business that is overtly religious? Why or why not?

2. Do you keep track of which businesses bill themselves as religious, which have taken no public stance, and which are run by atheists? Do you know of any resources for keeping track?

3. Say you pulled into a gas station and read this message on the pump. Would you still buy gas there? Say you have a choice between a Catholic hospital and a secular hospital. Do you avoid the Catholic hospital because it is Catholic?

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Could be a limitation with the LCD display...

If they are true believers they should get a better display, more expensive sure, but nothing is too good for Dog.

I guess I pick my battles. 

I would go to another gas station and avoid any stations from that chain in the future.  But you can get gas anywhere.

On the other hand, I didn't stop going to Chick-fil-A.  I don't like their stance, but I like the sandwich.  And there's only one place to get it.

Do you avoid religious businesses?

Yes, every chance I get.

1. Are you, as a consumer, less likely to spend at a business that is overtly religious? Why or why not?

Closed on sunday? Yeah, I'll be going somewhere else... On a more serious note: I am less likely to spend because I don't want my money (even if it's just a percentage of the profit) finding its way to a church or, even worse, some kind of hate group.

2. Do you keep track of which businesses bill themselves as religious, which have taken no public stance, and which are run by atheists? Do you know of any resources for keeping track?

Here in Australia it's not typically an issue... Gloria Jeans (the coffee place) is the only chain store I am aware of with any public stance on religion. Smaller businesses, such as those run by families, are more likely to display their religiosity, but I am also more forgiving of it in those circumstances.

3. Say you pulled into a gas station and read this message on the pump. Would you still buy gas there?

Yes, but it would likely be the last time.. unless there was another "gas" station nearby in which case I would probably just move on.

Say you have a choice between a Catholic hospital and a secular hospital. Do you avoid the Catholic hospital because it is Catholic?

No, I would choose the secular hospital.... because it is secular. In the absence of a secular hospital I would still go to a religious hospital.

I'm not sure that a practice of shunning fellow citizens for their beliefs is a healthy one in general for society.  Atheists shun religious businesses, religious shun atheist businesses ... where does it end?  Segregated neighborhoods and malls? 

I am delighted to buy a good product from an atheist, and it doesn't trouble me in the least if he or she chooses to use part of his profits to give to atheist charities.

I tend to agree but in the case of the gas station owner with the blatantly offensive "if you don't like it, leave..." comment staring you in the face at the pump then I would boycott that particular business. Why is it necessary to advertise one's religious faith in the first place? It's a petty superficial attitude.

I'd agree that at the point the behavior of the store proprietor is becoming offensive I would walk away, after a polite and friendly word to the manager and owner.  Polite and friendly because the goal is to change hearts and minds, not feel all self-righteous myself.

The times I can remember doing that mostly involved businesses that refused to serve fellow customers because of their skin color or age.  Though around these parts I find myself doing it a lot with older people who seem to believe that children skateboarding is a crime.

I'm not sure that a practice of shunning fellow citizens for their beliefs is a healthy one in general for society. Atheists shun religious businesses, religious shun atheist businesses ... where does it end?  Segregated neighborhoods and malls?

Exactly.

Imagine a gas station puts up a sign: 'Christian nation! Jews, if you don't like it. Leave!'

It's best to ignore the sign and patronize the business anyway. I mean, come on. Jews shun antisemites, antisemites shun Jews, non-bigots shun bigots. Where does it end?

Ignore bigotry. It's healthier. Otherwise, we'll end up with segregated neigborhoods and malls.

I am delighted to buy a good product from an atheist, and it doesn't trouble me in the least if he or she chooses to use part of his profits to give to atheist charities.

Exactly.

Atheist charities go to organizations like Doctors Without Borders, Oxfam, the American Red Cross, UNICEF, and the ACLU. You know. Helping the sick and poor with no strings attached. Defending the rights of LGBT people, women, minorities and non-believers from religiously motivated bigotry and oppression.

The lion's share of religious "charities" goes to support religion itself. You know. Proselytizing to the sick and poor, paying no taxes, and getting exemptions from civil rights laws. Perpetuating superstition. Oppressing LGBT people, womenminorities and non-believers.

It's a perfect symmetry. Not troubling to the religious in the least.

If the Catholic hospital had a more competent physician then it would be prudent to go there -your health is nothing to gamble with.

I try to avoid those who are psychotic, religious people can't tell the difference between reality and fantasy and are thus psychotic.

I patronize businesses I'm pretty sure are run by religious people. For example, I love Indian food and I bet most or perhaps all of the Indians running those restaurants are Hindus. Do they impose their religious positions on me? Well, yes, in the sense that there won't be any beef on the menu. Likewise for a Jewish delicatessen where there may be no pork products on the menu. Of course, Jewish people tend to be more practical and may have pork, ham, or bacon on the menu. They won't eat it themselves, perhaps, and may have it prepared and served by goyim.

I do avoid Christian businesses which tend to bring their religion into the transaction gratuitously. If they can't be avoided, I just "Uh huh" my way through the transaction and go on my way.

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