Some businesses readily demonstrate a preference for religiosity or have overtly religious management teams. One example is Chick-fil-A which cites religion as reasons for closing on Sunday and opposing gay marriage.

1. Are you, as a consumer, less likely to spend at a business that is overtly religious? Why or why not?

2. Do you keep track of which businesses bill themselves as religious, which have taken no public stance, and which are run by atheists? Do you know of any resources for keeping track?

3. Say you pulled into a gas station and read this message on the pump. Would you still buy gas there? Say you have a choice between a Catholic hospital and a secular hospital. Do you avoid the Catholic hospital because it is Catholic?

Views: 974

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

If they were Buddhists or Hindus, I probably would. If they were right-wing nut job evangelists, probably not, if I had an alternative.

I remember applying for a job when I was younger. This was a job doing marketing for a wood products company in a suburb of Bend, Oregon, which itself is smaller than a lot of suburbs of Portland, Oregon, where I lived at the time.

I did a brief interview which seemed to go okay. But then I was told that they had all applicants take a "psychological survey." After looking through it I recognized it as a screening questionnaire I had picked up off a Scientology table at my university. 

It had weird questions like "Have you ever felt guilty about looking at a particularly beautiful child?" (Looking for guilty pedophiles?)

I left without filling out the questionnaire. I didn't and don't want to work for Scientologists. I'd rather work for some of the milder stripes of Christians.

I admit I do avoid them if I know of their religiosity.

I know this makes me a bigot but I have been around this stuff so long I am burnt smooth out on it.

I just dont want to hear it any more.

Having first hand experience with how hypocritical the christian/evangelical business owners are, I do go out of my way to avoid them.

I would leave that gas station A) because of the stupid message, and B) they used a period when they should have used a comma.

Could be a limitation with the LCD display...

If they are true believers they should get a better display, more expensive sure, but nothing is too good for Dog.

I guess I pick my battles. 

I would go to another gas station and avoid any stations from that chain in the future.  But you can get gas anywhere.

On the other hand, I didn't stop going to Chick-fil-A.  I don't like their stance, but I like the sandwich.  And there's only one place to get it.

Do you avoid religious businesses?

Yes, every chance I get.

1. Are you, as a consumer, less likely to spend at a business that is overtly religious? Why or why not?

Closed on sunday? Yeah, I'll be going somewhere else... On a more serious note: I am less likely to spend because I don't want my money (even if it's just a percentage of the profit) finding its way to a church or, even worse, some kind of hate group.

2. Do you keep track of which businesses bill themselves as religious, which have taken no public stance, and which are run by atheists? Do you know of any resources for keeping track?

Here in Australia it's not typically an issue... Gloria Jeans (the coffee place) is the only chain store I am aware of with any public stance on religion. Smaller businesses, such as those run by families, are more likely to display their religiosity, but I am also more forgiving of it in those circumstances.

3. Say you pulled into a gas station and read this message on the pump. Would you still buy gas there?

Yes, but it would likely be the last time.. unless there was another "gas" station nearby in which case I would probably just move on.

Say you have a choice between a Catholic hospital and a secular hospital. Do you avoid the Catholic hospital because it is Catholic?

No, I would choose the secular hospital.... because it is secular. In the absence of a secular hospital I would still go to a religious hospital.

I'm not sure that a practice of shunning fellow citizens for their beliefs is a healthy one in general for society.  Atheists shun religious businesses, religious shun atheist businesses ... where does it end?  Segregated neighborhoods and malls? 

I am delighted to buy a good product from an atheist, and it doesn't trouble me in the least if he or she chooses to use part of his profits to give to atheist charities.

I tend to agree but in the case of the gas station owner with the blatantly offensive "if you don't like it, leave..." comment staring you in the face at the pump then I would boycott that particular business. Why is it necessary to advertise one's religious faith in the first place? It's a petty superficial attitude.

RSS

Events

Services we love!

© 2015   Created by umar.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service