"Babies Are Not Born Atheists" is an article published by Chris Benek, editor of the christianpost.com. His assertions are laughable at best. He mentions that the declining numbers of religious observers are more a problem of ineffective "formational training and nurture," rather than blaming technology or theological differences. You can correctly interpret formational training as a synonym for religious indoctrination. His loose definition of what constitutes a god allows him to make the claim that we all believe in god. Who can objectively judge when someone else's interest, passion, or hobby is deemed excessive? I'm not buying it- my passion for the viniculture hobby is not a god. Sorry. 

And then there's his position that we all are not born atheists. He attempts to persuade the reader that we are some how biologically predisposed to accept and welcome indoctrination. I find his assertion that an infant's need for a mother's milk constitutes a form of worship as a stretch of the imagination. A human's proclivity for self preservation cannot be reasonably construed to be a form of worship. The basic needs in life are just that.

He states in part "it is our failure as Christians to humbly hear and respond to constructive criticism that demonstrates to the younger generation that we aren't really willing to work for Christ's redemptive purposes." I wonder if he considers the atheist demand for evidence of supernatural existence as constructive criticism? He well should for if he chooses to ignore such an inquiry then he loses all accountability.

His assertion is that the ineffectual biblical indoctrination of our youth is the at the root of the Xtian church's problem with declining numbers. And that older, more mature, Xtians are living a modern secular lifestyle that sends the wrong message to the younger generations. It seems reasonable to live in a manner that affords us the most comfort and enjoyment. The days of dragging their cross upon their back for everyone to see seems to have fallen out of favor. Splendid.

Mr. Benek's arguments don't seem to hold much water. It is my sincerest hope that he and others of his ilk continue to fumble with this indoctrination problem. 

http://www.christianpost.com/news/babies-are-not-born-atheists-139423/

 

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I hated the bullshit answers I was given. Thunder is god moving furniture. Wind is god's loving arms around you. I was 7 years old and mad because everyone treated me like I was an frikkin' idiot. Maybe it comes down to personality type or intelligence to be politically incorrect. Dumb asses just believe what you tell them. Its no accident that the first thing most repressive organizations do is eliminate the intellectuals.

"Its no accident that the first thing most repressive organizations do is eliminate the intellectuals."

+1

I think if the USA, instead of trying to ban religion from the classrooms, were to teach a broad selection of different religions, it could keep religion out of the science classes where it dilutes the quality of knowledge imparted.

At some point I used to think this was a good course of action, but I have come to believe it isn't.It is rare that you will find Christian teachers who are willing to tell their students that all these other religious beliefs are considered as true by their believers.

Two, religious instruction contributes nothing to the cumulative wisdom of society. It only prepares the ground for indoctrination. A few people manage to see through the BS and leave unscathed but for the majority, the results are disastrous.

I think if the USA, instead of trying to ban religion from the classrooms, were to teach a broad selection of different religions, it could keep religion out of the science classes where it dilutes the quality of knowledge imparted.

In this I agree completely, @Strega.  I have long advocated that the way to keep people from getting their dander up and trying to take over schools and science classes is to give them a small space of their own, where they can learn about philosophy and religion.  Invite in the priest, the minister, the rabbi, and the imam to teach different sections. 

Heck, in the modern world it's important even for atheists to have a much better understanding of religious thinkers than they seem to have, since religions of different sorts are present in politics and ethnicities and current events around the world.

I would do the same with economics, quite frankly.  Get the climate-science-deniers out of classrooms, but let them have an economics class where the costs of rapid transitions to non-fossil fuels can be given full airing.

Okay,, he said: "biologically predisposed to accept and welcome indoctrination." How about that we have a tendency to doubt and investigate any teaching? His article is easy to be debunked ;)

Dr. Bob, I agree we all try to teach children things. I oppose religious education indoctrination because it makes the child dependent on the priest and the ghostly supports. And even such a one as you is unable to free himself from such primitive beliefs.

You must be thinking of some other religion than mine, @onyango.   I'm not dependent on priests or ghostly supports, whatever those are.

All education does is try to provide people with ways of thinking or looking at the world.  The extent to which they come to trust and rely on those ways of thinking depends on how successful those ways of thinking are for them. 

If you truly believe atheism is the better idea, then you should have no fear of that idea competing in the broad marketplace of ideas, with kids or anyone else. 

Bob, you say

If you truly believe atheism is the better idea, then you should have no fear of that idea competing in the broad marketplace of ideas, with kids or anyone else. 

as if you are unaware of the thousands of people deluded into thinking, there is a god and that this god listens to their mumblings. 

Children are never given the option to choose between on delusion and another. They are born and raised in their culture of their parents. Only very few manage to see through the BS. And you know this

Atheism isn't an idea Bob. It is the rejection of a stupid idea.

And if you believe that rejection of a stupid idea is better than accepting the idea, then you should have no fear of that notion competing in the broad marketplace of ideas, with kids or anyone else.

Agreed. Religious studies should be taught in school. For example, children should learn that Christians believe that Jesus died for our sins and was resurrected and this idea is very important to them. They should (in my opinion) also be informed there is no evidence to support this historical event occurring. Similarly, in science they should learn that scientists believe that life evolved from humble beginnings and here is the wealth of evidence to support that view. We don't have room in the school for all of it so go to the local museum, library, etc.

I would have no fear of this broad marketplace of ideas.

If have no problem with children being exposed to religion...simply not in public school taught in an indoctrinating way (but as a cultural study)...and outside of the school amongst family members and friends...certainly never to the point where it becomes abusive (terrorising children with the idea of hell, forcing them to believe that every day natural behaviour is sick making them evil if they do it...only alowing extreme religious ideas with the rejection of any independent thinking and so on). That is what is meant by child abuse and we are all aware that not all parents who push their religion on their children (or even just talk about their religion with their children) are abusive.

I don't think you'll find many people here arguing that children should never be exposed to silly religious ideas. Perhaps it's another one of your hyper-over-generalization of atheists.

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