For a long time people that know me have been telling me they think I may suffer from depression and/or anxiety.  So much so that I began to believe it.  I am still somewhat open to the possibility, but my position on the matter is: so what?  I'm not hurting anyone.  I'm certainly not going to alter my body chemistry just because it doesn't match what is "normal".  Where would evolution have gone if all species could change themselves back to "normal"?

 

Last night I read this article about shyness, introversion, and social anxiety.  It confirmed many of my thoughts on the matter, and got me to research introversion more.  Before, I had been aware of the general idea of introversion/extroversion (never studied psychology that much), but I did not know that it could be such a specific and pervasive behavioral trait.  After much reading I found that on the introvert/extrovert scale, I'm about as introverted as you could possibly get.

 

Anyway, in the article the author references Winifred Gallagher: “The glory of the disposition that stops to consider stimuli rather than rushing to engage with them is its long association with intellectual and artistic achievement."  It got me thinking about religion.  Are introverts more likely to analyze the inconsistencies and problems with religion before (or even after) committing to one?  How many atheists are introverts?

 

So, do you consider yourself more introverted than extroverted?  A poll would be awesome, but I don't see an option to add one.

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sorry to hear that , my father embarrassed the hell out of me as well.  Every time I had to play piano for a school concert , my father would throw a hysterical fit in front of EVERYONE .... about how he can't stand crowds , how terrible I sounded on the piano , how he can't stand these sort of concerts ... he cussed out my long time mentor , a choir director at my high school ... cussed me out a few times in front of crowds that knew me.  Oh my god , It was so awful.  He would also tease me and make fun of me and ask me really stupid questions like 'are you gay , it's ok ... just never seen you with a girlfriend before'    

 

(Maybe it's because I am too embarrassed to bring a female friend around you , ever think of that? is what I wanted to tell him)  

I'm pretty lucky in that regard, though my mother is clearly histrionic.

My father shipped out for whaling when he was 15 and had been drunk in at least a dozen harbor cities in a dozen different countries by the time he was 20 - he never forgot how it was to be young. His harshest critizism of my frequent mistakes growing up were the stinging truisms "Told you so!", "You can believe in Church, in the real world you have to know", and the worst one was whenever I tried to explain my failures with sentences beginning with "I never thought XYZ could happen..." he would respond "You never thought - exactly. You never think."

Anyway, my parents managed to bring me up quite successfully, and the worst type of upbrining I can give my children is the one I received. 

I registered as ESTJ on MB twice and I took it 10 years apart. I don't think I'm overwhelmingly extroverted though. At times I'm outgoing and at times I'm introverted.

 

I don't think that introversion is the same as being depressed, but I do believe that depression is a real illness that is worth treating. Saying "I'm not going to alter my body chemistry because it doesn't match what is normal" could also be applied to: "My cholesterol levels are dangerously high, but I'm not going to take medication to alter them. After all, I'm not hurting anyone by abstaining from statin therapy."


We get one go around at life, so why not be happy if we can, right?

A valid point.  But then again, there are natural ways to lower cholesterol, right?  Exercise, better diet, etc.

 

I guess I'm just very weary of taking psychotherapeutic (not sure if that's the right word) drugs.

Psychotropics can save lives, damage people, or be effective to degrees in between. Not everyone's the same, and prescriptions often start with low doses, because being wary is a good thing.

It makes sense to start with a counselor, first, then determine if a psych might enhance the therapy. It's always your choice in how to proceed (or not proceed). I used to hate being an introvert, and thought of it as a handicap. Now I'm a hundred times more okay with myself than I was before, and succeeding at more endeavors.

But that's just Me.

I'm definitely an introvert, have been my whole life. I hate meaningless conversation, I can only "shoot the shit" for about 2minutes before I get either bored and disinterested or down right annoyed. The article the OP listed is pretty much me spot on 1-10.

Interesting question, introverts do spend more time with themselves and their minds so it would make sense for them to look deeper into these types of questions.

 

I am an atheist, a very new one. It took me awhile to be okay with admitting it aloud. And yes I am an introvert. I like to watch documentaries and listen to podcasts in my free time which is one of the reasons why it led to to this new state of mind.

I'm certainly an introvert. I need a lot of alone time and prefer small social gathering in places comfortable to me as opposed to large events full of people and I certainly spend a good deal of time inside my own head analyzing everything. I can on occasion be extroverted when I am in a comfortable situation and I certainly enjoy being around friends and socializing. 

 

As for the MBTI no matter which version of the test I take I always score INTJ. I don't however put much stock into the MBTI since it's scientific backing is scant to none... I treat it similar to a horoscope it's fun and interesting but not worth putting a lot of stock in.

 

 

When I was younger, I was definitely an introvert. Very shy, and talked to pretty much no one. But I've certainly gotten better through the years and am much less shy now. I wouldn't go so far as to call me extroverted or a social butterfly, but I no longer have issues talking with new people or holding conversations. Truth be told, I do find large boisterous groups annoying more often than not, and would rather go online or read a good book. Keeping to myself used to be how I spent 100% of my time, but now I can do that or go out and comfortably have a good time amongst the public. But if I had to say I was one or the other, I'd say that I'm still more introverted than extroverted.

@Kasu: No, no, no! Introversion is neither good nor bad, but it is an innate and enduring personality trait: NOT the same thing as shyness or timidity, although there is some overlap. The simplest definition of an introvert is someone who is energized from *inside*, and therefore has less need for external stimulation. I strongly recommend that you look up the book _The Introvert Advantage_.

So would a shy or timid person necessarily be an introvert?  That seems like more than overlap.

 

I'm not disagreeing with you, I'm just trying to clarify in my own mind the differences.

I'm introverted, but I don't think being introverted is a good thing.  I think it's a sign of low self-esteem, low self-confidence, or other factors that limit comfortable self-expression.

 

That's too far reaching.  Low-self esteem and self-confidence are fairly common traits that are also commonly found in extraverts, in my experience.  Insecurity, in general, seems to be near ubiquitous in humans.  Where low self-esteem may drive some to withdraw, it can also lead others to confirmation seeking behaviour, or the need for constant social reaffirmation.  A lack of self-confidence may make some avoid groups because they are afraid to view themselves in the eyes of others, but it may also cause others to avoid being alone because they are afraid of being left to only their own thoughts and honest self-reflection.

 

But those are very generalized statements, none of which are categorically true.  Introversion and extraversion may be fair descriptors of behaviour, but that doesn't mean that terms really reveal much about the mechanics that drive that behaviour.

 

I equate introverted with shy and timid, which means it's the result of feelings of intimidation.  You can argue that some introverts aren't shy, but I would question whether, in these cases, their social identities match their true identities.

 

That equation is incorrect.  Introverts can certainly be introverts primarily based on preference.  Not everyone is stimulated or fulfilled in the same way.  Shyness and timidity may lead to introverted behaviour, but it's not the only way not get there.

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