Eventually there comes a time when we as rational adults have to give up some things in the face of logic.
Religion is probably the biggest hurdle.
Besides giving up the belief in a nostalgic paradise after death, there are a ton of other modes of thought we have to let go of.
Here is a list of the things I miss believing in:

Karma- The world isn't fair. Bad things happen to good people, and vice versa. The idea that the dickheads of existence would eventually get what's coming to them had always been a comfort to me. Call it hell, karma, justice or whatever, the fact of the matter is that humans are imperfect, so is our system of fairness. Our laws and punishments don't work 100% of the time. Nature itself is only fair in such a broad way, it does little to appease the individual situations that I am forced to witness. I want people to be held accountable, damnit! Letting go of that notion was hard for me.

Ghosts/ESP/Astrology/Whatever- Right, not so much the astrology for me personally, but I have always been in love with the supernatural. In fact, I do still cling on to this notion more than any self respecting atheist should. Evidence points to the conclusion that there is no "beyond the veil" but I just like to think that there are energies/dimensions/again, whatever out there that science hasn't discovered the technology to explore yet, let alone explain. As I said. I LIKE to think that. I'm not saying I do (anywhere but in the secret fantasies of my own overly imaginative brain.) All technology is magic to anyone sufficiently ignorant to it's workings. Hell, my iphone could be a wizard's wand for all I know....right? Anyway. I mourn the ghost stories of my childhood. I have to realize that frightening coincidences are just that. Coincidence.

Friends and Family- While this isn't a system of belief so much as it is a real, physical loss, I have to realize that there are some people out there that cannot accept my lack of faith. These people have systematically cut me from their lives. It was probably the most humane thing to do, in all honesty. I know there are certain right-wing god-fearing women out there that I love but can no longer stand the presence of due to the drastic differences in our ideology. :(

Someone looking out for me- Religion teaches you that there is always someone that loves you, and there is always some master plan. Even if things are bad now, they will be better soon, and all problems will be magically resolved as long as you keep the faith. As much bullshit as it is, the feeling that I don't have too much responsibilities for my failures was always a nice one. Especially now when I'm underemployed. Oh what I'd give to be able to sleep at night knowing that god doesn't close a window without opening a door.

Ultimate enlightenment- Even as a child, the concept of heaven sounded flimsy to me. It was.. well.. boring. But learning all the answers to the questions I accumulated was the one thing that made it ok to die. Oh... that and pet heaven. I am far too curious to sit on a fluffy cloud and play the harp, but I would like to know EVERYTHING that has always bugged me.

So that's my list. I'm sure I'll think of more later on.
You guys tell me about the things you miss now!

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Well technically you can be an agnostic atheist or a gnostic atheist (same with theism), atheism means you don't believe in god and the agnostic/gnostic part means you don't don't (or do) believe because you know it for a fact or you don't know for sure, but still believe one way or the other. That's just semantics though, but the usage of the word agnostic these days is a pet peeve of mine.

People who say they are agnostic in the sense that it is generally used (incorrectly) today though, usually say there's about a 50/50 chance so they can't lean one way or the other. I think the 50/50 stance is BS to be frank, and don't give voice to that at all.
So, in essence, you live you life as though you are a hard atheist, but give voice to the agnostic position. In the profession we call that cognitive dissonance.
I call it not claiming to know for a fact what I don't have the evidence to support.
so I don't completely dismiss it, but only to the same extent that I don't completely dismiss the chance that I might be teleported to the moon at any second.

Exactly! There is a very, very small chance that all of my atoms will spontaneously quantum tunnel to Mars at the same instant, in the same configuration as they are now. But it's so unlikely that it can be safely ignored as 'close enough to impossible so as to not matter'.
Nope. I am 99.9999999(repeating) percent certain that there are no gods. No Zeus, no FSM, no Yahweh, no Thor, no Ra, etc. But I accept the possibility that future evidence may prove me wrong. A deist god that initiated the big bang and never intervened again, for example, would not contradict any of the evidence that we have at the moment. Of course, there is no evidence that such a being exists, either.

The point is, it would be intellectually dishonest to say that I *know* that there are no gods. Specific gods and claims for gods, those can be ascertained with some degree of certainty. For example, The fundamentalist, literalist interpretation of God of the Bible can be disproven based on the claims that they make for him. (Great Flood, beleivers can drink poison and be just fine, etc). So while individual gods may be able to be disproved, all possible definitions cannot be, particularly when the deity is question is to vaguely defined as to be practically non-existent/impotent.
Very well said.
As I have pointed out times before, it would be intellectually dishonest to claim to "know" (as in absolute certitude) anything. So why do we need to preface certain things with our uncertainty? I "know" that my couch is in my living room even though I am in another room and cannot see it. Just because there is a chance it teleported to Mars does not mean I need to preface my statements regarding the whereabouts of my couch with terms of uncertainty.

I'm perfectly fine with stating that no gods exist just as I am fine with stating that my couch is in my living room right now. Any semantic issues with these statements is merely hair splitting and a bold presumption on the listener's (or reader's) part that I am also claiming to have absolute knowledge.

Of course, I know many theists believe in certainty and that this needs to be explained to them as well as some others. But I see no reason for atheists to carry this extra burden of word play because of the errant notions of the deluded.
I agree when it comes to defining atheist as "gnostic" or "agnostic". The reason I pointed this out isn't because I think atheists should have to use this terminology, I just get perturbed when people use the word "agnostic" on it's own to describe their 50/50 stance.
I had to really think about that. I don't think I have come across anyone who has used it that way. Of course, people I spend the most time with (mostly co-workers) don't use terms like gnostic or agnostic.
Not even Jalby, who kept insisting that whether or not there was a god was a 50/50 question, just like a coin flip?
I quit paying him any attention early on.
The majority of my friends label themselves as "agnostic" - but when I discuss things further with them it turns out their at the 50/50 line. I've also had a few random discussions with quite a few people about religion, and they used agnostic in that sense, too. Oh well. Haha. Like I said, pet peeve of mine, it's obviously not really a huge deal :)

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