A question of Justice and Equity regarding a flute

Imagine three children, Robert, Carl, and Samuel arguing about a flute. Robert made the flute, and therefore naturally says it's his. Poor Carl, unlike Robert and Samuel, doesn't have any other toys to play with. Samuel also claims the flute because he is the only one who is actually able to play it.

Who should get the flute, and why?

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Robert lends the flute to Samuel, who plays sweet music for Carl and Robert to enjoy.

But who leaves with the flute, to enjoy for himself after curfew..?

Moot point really, since neither Robert nor Carl can actually play it.  Technically, it belongs to Robert, but if they are unable to share, they aren't very nice kids, are they?

Capitalist answer, Robert made it, it's his.

Socialist answer, Samuel can actually use it, it's his.

The real Answer, Robert makes two more, Samuel teaches them how to play, and Carl benefits from how society is really supposed to work.

Or Robert teaches Samuel and Carl how to make their own...

This is also acceptable. Freedom of information. If you're good at something, make the person next to you good at it too. Think of all the skills we've lost over generations because of Proprietary Trade Secrets. http://www.toptenz.net/top-10-lost-technologies.php

Think of all the beneficial things brought into being using the profits arising from proprietarily-protected products that preceded them. Think if iPhones and iPads, Blu Ray, many medicines, and lots of other technological products.

BTW. checked out that link and burst out laughing at the discussion of Damascus steel. Damascus steel is no longer secret. It's being made today. 

Do the modern blades perform as the legendary Damascus blades did? No. However, that's because legends aren't necessarily fact. You think bullshitting was invented in recent times? Of course not.

Many of the supposed feats of Damascus steel are simply impossible. Chopping a rock in half? Maybe, depending on how weak the structure of the rock. But with no damage to the steel blade? Impossible, simply because if it's a real rock, it's got plenty of silica in it, which is significantly harder than steel ever can be simply because of the molecular structures of the two substances. Another legend: You could lay a sword with the cutting edge facing up and drop a sheet of silk on it and the blade would cut the silk merely due to the weight of the cloth. Don't make me laugh.

I use Linux and Android. Android, out of the box can do far more, and is much more user friendly than Apple iOS. My current phone uses a custom security enhanced rom, and My computer dual boots Ubuntu and Windows 8. Win 8, and all previous versions of Windows have performed miserably on my system, despite all the tweaks I make to them to increase their performance. Ubuntu on the other hand flies like a bat outta hell, coming out of a cold boot on my solid state drive as if it were in sleep mode.

The Polio Vaccine was created using a public and open system, which allowed it to be freely available, and had it not been for religious rabble rousers, the virus would be completely extinct. The flu virus continuously mutates and adapts partly because not everyone can spare the 15 or so dollars that the vaccine costs.

We've been able to replicate the look of Damascus Steel, but it's not true Damascus. Damascus steel blades were unusually strong and kept their edge much longer than traditional steel. Yes there was quite a bit of legend about them, but antique examples still exist, though none that I know of are in good enough repair to define the forging process from. Would they be better than stainless? or other alloys we know of today? No. probably not. But using the technique, who's to say that these alloys couldn't be improved?

The cloth legend might actually have some truth to it, though. You can do that with a well honed straight razor and a heavy cloth, and silk does come in different weights just like any other textile.

Any amazing advance made by a corporation for profit, can be replicated and improved by a community of people who just want to do it. SourceForge.net has thousands of examples of this.

I use Linux and Android. Android, out of the box can do far more, and is much more user friendly than Apple iOS. My current phone uses a custom security enhanced rom, and My computer dual boots Ubuntu and Windows 8. Win 8, and all previous versions of Windows have performed miserably on my system, despite all the tweaks I make to them to increase their performance. Ubuntu on the other hand flies like a bat outta hell, coming out of a cold boot on my solid state drive as if it were in sleep mode.

The main thing the unix/linux/etc. fans don't seem to appreciate is that most of us don't lose sleep over the fact that our Windows or Apple computer takes a minute or two to boot up. Most of us aren't using applications that make us wait unterminable periods of time, such that we feel a need to explore other possibilities. Most of us don't want the learning curve. And, rightly or wrongly, we aren't even as concerned about security as much as perhaps we should be.

The Polio Vaccine was created using a public and open system, which allowed it to be freely available, and had it not been for religious rabble rousers, the virus would be completely extinct. The flu virus continuously mutates and adapts partly because not everyone can spare the 15 or so dollars that the vaccine costs.

The flu vaccine should be free to anyone who wants it but can't afford it, but it wouldn't be necessary to turn it into a public domain product to do so. Indeed, enough profit could be built into the fee charged those who can pay for the vaccine to cover those people. And part of the rest of the profits should, simply as good business practice, be devoted to developing other pharmaceutical products.

We've been able to replicate the look of Damascus Steel, but it's not true Damascus. Damascus steel blades were unusually strong and kept their edge much longer than traditional steel. Yes there was quite a bit of legend about them, but antique examples still exist, though none that I know of are in good enough repair to define the forging process from. Would they be better than stainless? or other alloys we know of today? No. probably not. But using the technique, who's to say that these alloys couldn't be improved?

Yes, when I referred to the fact that we have replicated the look, that is what I meant, but I think that is all that's needed, because all of the other so-called "properties" of the old Damascus steel are probably mythological horseshit. That said, the modern reproductions of Damascus blades are very fine blades with very good properties.

The cloth legend might actually have some truth to it, though. You can do that with a well honed straight razor and a heavy cloth, and silk does come in different weights just like any other textile.

I'd like to see that. I'm skeptical till then.

Any amazing advance made by a corporation for profit, can be replicated and improved by a community of people who just want to do it. SourceForge.net has thousands of examples of this.

Any? I doubt it. Back to vaccines for an example. Do you have any idea of the expense involved in producing pharmaceuticals? The lab and lab equipment. The highly specialized employees and technicians required. The months and years of animal and human studies. Some things might be done by a SourceForge.net-type of operation, but not everything. Some things will have to be done financed either by profit or by the government.

Play one perfect tune and burn it.

Solution #1: Well, King Solomon would propose cutting the flute into thirds, in which case Robert would say he didn't want it, hoping not to see it destroyed. Then, Solomon says, "Okay, then, I'll cut it in half." At this point the other two say, "Fuck it, then." Solomon gives the flute back to Robert, who probably wouldn't have made a flute without being able to play one and intended to sell it on Craigslist anyway.

Solution #2: Since the flute presumably belongs to Robert, it's his property to do with as he wishes.

Because Robert used natural resources which belonged equally to Carl and Samuel to make his flute, he is obliged to repay an equitable portion to Carl and Samuel.

In a larger, scaled-up scenario, Robert would pay into a fund controlled by duly elected representatives of their community, for them to decide the manner in which the proceeds should be divvied out.  If those representatives were honest and had the community's best interests at heart, they would most likely use the proceeds for education so Carl could learn to play the flute and Samuel could learn to build his own.

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