I remember watching the latest Cosmos series, with astrophysicist Tyson as the narrator, and being completely in awe at the show's depiction of the utter vastness of our universe. There was one episode where Tyson, on board his faster than light spacecraft, began to travel through the galaxy with Earth being shown in the distance. Becoming ever smaller our blue planet faded away as he moved beyond our solar system and galaxy and entered into distant galaxies millions of light years away. He finally reached a point where the spacecraft turned around and began the trip back the other way. Ultimately one could see a faint speck that slowly grew larger until it was recognized -Earth!

If only we could take today's theist and place them on such a spacecraft and let them experience first hand the incomprehensible immensity of our universe and the innumerable planetary bodies that it holds. I don't understand how anyone could believe that our little rock, tucked away in our cozy solar system, amid the millions of other solar systems in the Milky Way galaxy, is the apple of some creator's eye. Our planet is so dismally insignificant in the overall scope of the universe. I don't believe most humans, especially those with a religious slant, ever consider that insignificance. It's almost as if they subconsciously believe we really are the center of the universe and that their god spends it's time being concerned with the minutia of our daily existence. Nothing could be so far from the truth. We are literally one oversized rock from being blasted into oblivion. We scurry about on this little planet without a care as to our cosmic vulnerability.

Would the perspective of our planet from a billion miles away help illuminate the understanding of those who are more secure thinking that we are somehow special and watched over constantly by a celestial baby sitter? Did those first views from the moon back in the sixties serve as any kind of a wake up call to those who think we have an invisible friend? When I stop and remember that there were human beings who thought the Xtian Jesus was on a spacecraft trailing the comet Hale-Bop it makes me think I should probably retract those questions.

Perhaps the enormity of our universe is truly inconsequential to those with a religious mind. I've never met a cosmologist but I doubt many could be of a religious nature. 

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The religious are pure solipsists. 

The answer to your question is, alas, "nope."

There have already been pictures of the earth taken from so far away it's just a pale blue dot (google that phrase), pictures of the entire solar system (albeit, photomosaics).  No sign of any "earth is special" fundies extracting their heads from their craniums; in fact I'd be willing to bet that many of them have doubled down on it.

But I wonder if physically transporting them through the universe would somehow allow them to realize that our planet, sitting in one of many "goldilocks zones," is one very small piece of a huge ongoing process. What would make some "double down" on believing our earth is the chosen rock of the universe that a god is incessantly observing? It's as if theists are content to just ignore the continually unfolding story of our universe, along with all the physical laws of nature that has shaped it into what it is.

I don't understand how anyone could believe that our little rock, tucked away in our cozy solar system, amid the millions of other solar systems in the Milky Way galaxy, is the apple of some creator's eye. Our planet is so dismally insignificant in the overall scope of the universe.

Meh. I don't understand how someone can read the Torah and find God not the most disgusting pugnacious asshole that has ever been described in all of fiction. Yet they still do. A voyage through the Galaxy will result in them thanking God for the opportunity to see it and fly around, rather than the scientists and engineers who made their voyage possible.

Would Xtians be reluctant to get on board a craft headed into the distant reaches of our universe if they thought they might miss the Rapture/Second Coming of Christ?

Yes. Hell yes.

The Pale Blue Dot video…that’s here.

The Scale of the Universe.

The Institute for Pale Blue Dots in honor of Carl Sagan.

My “A” for Atheist tattoo.

Gorgeous.

I think nowadays everyone understands that the universe is incomprehensibly vast,  but if someone believes it was created by an invisible sorcerer with magical powers, they probably can't be reasoned with, especially if they've been convinced they'll burn in Hell if they stop believing.

Oh hear heavens...God is a sorcerer? Seems like we have another fundamentalist atheist...just like they all are.

Guilty as charged. LOL

Not sure about all of them, but yep.

"When we read about Creation in Genesis, we run the risk of imagining God was a magician, with a magic wand able to do everything.  But that is not so." - Pope Francis

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